The Modern Antiquarian. Ancient Sites, Stone Circles, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic Mysteries

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Springfield Lyons Causewayed Enclosure / Image by moss

The lidar for the Ba enclosure has a series of pit outside the eastern entrance which is this enclosures western edge. Not much compensation I know, but a little... juamei Posted by juamei
31 Jan 16ce

Springfield Lyons Causewayed Enclosure / Image by moss

Problem is Gladman, they seem to have built a large building over it. It was 'edgeland' bordered on two sides by surburbia, and then of course B&Q and other buildings. Terribly sad... moss Posted by moss
31 Jan 16ce

Callaigh Berra's House / Image by ryaner

Any idea what the highest passage grave in Ireland is? Obviously Seefin in the Wicklows is higher than Slieve Gullion... GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
31 Jan 16ce

Big Moor / Image by wiccaman9


Yeah visited this a good few years back when out rock sniffing. Personally don't think they're cups. More likely bullet scars.
harestonesdown Posted by harestonesdown
31 Jan 16ce

Springfield Lyons Causewayed Enclosure / Image by moss

Really interesting, Moss. This has been on the list for years... should really go now GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
31 Jan 16ce

Callaigh Berra's House / Image by ryaner

The highest remaining passage grave in the 2 islands, they say. ryaner Posted by ryaner
31 Jan 16ce

Halnaker Hill / Image by juamei

Hey, this too is interesting as I hadn't noticed the second depression almost dew(haha) north of the dew pond by the gate. Wonder if it was a pond barrow? No mention of it anywhere when I was researching the enclosure. Also this shows just how faint the bank is in the northern sector. Again, many thanks! A R Cane Posted by A R Cane
31 Jan 16ce

Court Hill / Image by juamei

Having just added this site it's really interesting to see it like this. It's actually bigger than I presumed, even after looking at the satellite image, could even be two rings though the edge of the copse might be giving a 'false' ring. Thanks so much for posting this. A R Cane Posted by A R Cane
31 Jan 16ce

Callaigh Berra's House / Image by ryaner

Wow, what a place. thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
31 Jan 16ce

Birdlip Camp / Image by juamei

That's fascinating, looks like two widely spaced ramparts - only one is visible on the ground. Might have to go an have another look. thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
31 Jan 16ce

Callaigh Berra's House / Image by ryaner

My general policy is to stay inside when its snowing so I should be ok ;) juamei Posted by juamei
31 Jan 16ce

Callaigh Berra's House / Image by ryaner

Try it when it's not snowing Juamei. ;-) ryaner Posted by ryaner
31 Jan 16ce

Callaigh Berra's House / Image by ryaner

Wow, one for the must see list next time we visit the relatives in Warren point.. juamei Posted by juamei
31 Jan 16ce

Callaigh Berra's House / Image by ryaner

Fantastic place. GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
31 Jan 16ce

West Kennett / News by tjj

First the good news....The drainage inside seems to work even after the heavy rain we have had recently.....The small infill dry-stone walling in the facade has been repaired.
Not so good (temporary?) news.....The wide access path up has been torn to shreds and rutted. Presumably this will be re-instated.
Now the "If only they had asked me" news.....The old concrete slab over the end chamber has been replaced with a much thicker one. The only light coming in is through a tiny vertical ' porthole' less than 9 inches in diameter (muddied over on the surface) and down a tube through the thick concrete. It makes much of the chamber invisible without a torch. There is a similar 'porthole' further east. The old lighting made the interior mysterious, the new makes it just gloomy......On top, the thick concrete has been covered by a scrape of soil and turfed. I give this 6 months before the turf dies of drought and is eroded by footfall back to the concrete. This area has the heaviest usage outside the barrow........Access to the top is now by 10 shallow wooden-edged steps, unfortunately because of this shallowness the treads slope and the shingle covering them will quickly migrate downhill, this might be alleviated by doubling the number of steps. However improving the lighting would involve drilling another 'porthole' through the thick concrete. Don't hold your breath.
It's difficult to know what this expensive "Repair" was meant to achieve. Was the old roof dangerous?
I hope someone else can inspect this well-loved site and report.
Jimit.
jimit Posted by jimit
31 Jan 16ce

Banchor / Fieldnotes by drewbhoy

Nice one Drew. How on earth did you find this one.... strathspey Posted by strathspey
30 Jan 16ce

Ladybower Tor / Image by wiccaman9



The abstraction makes it even more interesting for me .

Yes , often found on what were probably through routes .

Different explanations possible for apparently similar outcomes .
tiompan Posted by tiompan
30 Jan 16ce

Ladybower Tor / Image by wiccaman9

Morris's list is funny - from possible hypotheses to absolute nonsense.

The fact that most of the rock art in the UK is SO ABSTRACT cf. rest of Europe/elsewhere (which has animal motifs, potential humanoid shapes, etc) is so unusual, differing from the norm.

Territorial markers, walk routes/route markers, defining upland areas from lowlands, etc seem to be the most likely uses of the carvings...

wiccaman9 Posted by wiccaman9
30 Jan 16ce

Ladybower Tor / Image by wiccaman9

Of course everyone is entitled to an opinion ,that's why I expressed mine .

Nothing wrong with putting forward an hypothesis and similarly nothing wrong with pointing out perceved problems with hypotheses .

Yes ,the engravings have intrigued many for a long time , the famous 120 (or is it 110 ?) list from Morris gets a small number of additions over the years ,but I don't believe any examples from the thousands of potential examples in the UK Ireland have ever been proved to be convincing maps of the local landscape or heavens .
I would suggest that the penannular does define the enclosed engravings but does not represent a territorial /natural boundary .
tiompan Posted by tiompan
30 Jan 16ce

Cothiemuir Wood / Image by GLADMAN

As you'll no doubt appreciate, Mr Cane, very difficult to capture anything with that light contrast... in retrospect my previous posts were too light. If at first you don't succeed... have another go and maybe get a little closer :-) GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
30 Jan 16ce

Ladybower Tor / Image by wiccaman9

Hey there,

Surely we are all entitled to our opinions!?

I'm not an authority of the Bronze-Age mind, nobody could claim to be!

Where's the harm in hypothesising?

The depictions have intrigued many a researcher/antiquarian for 150+ years and undoubtedly will continue to...

I suggested the possibility of the ring could indicate a 'possible' boundary, but quite simply, it could be a carving to define the carvings within?

wiccaman9 Posted by wiccaman9
30 Jan 16ce

Ladybower Tor / Image by wiccaman9

Great , thanks Aron .That clarifies it .

It doesn't help that the markings are not too clear but I don't think your plan is similar to what is seen on the stone . If we accept the 2003 D.A.J. drawing as being close it is quite different .
Further problems are the unlikeliness of a bird's eye view as opposed to the more obvious "view from " .
Where are the precedents ? Others have claimed that some motifs in UK/Irish rock art motifs depict landscapes and sometimes represenations of the sky but they have always failed the test . If you have four or five cups or raised sections they could be argued to represent anything .
Where is the boundary i.e. the penannular ,in the landscape . ? If it represents a particular territory we might expect some obvious natural markers for that , e.g. streams , big rocks etc .
tiompan Posted by tiompan
30 Jan 16ce

Big Moor / Image by wiccaman9

Yes indeed, a rock mounted upright, pock marked on the eastern surface wiccaman9 Posted by wiccaman9
30 Jan 16ce

Ladybower Tor / Fieldnotes by wiccaman9

Please find enclosed images/interpretative sketch to show an aerial interpretation of the countryside to the south-south west of the Ladybower tor site...Win/Crook hills, rivers Derwent and Ashop, the Moscar/Bamford moors and Stanage edge with a step up onto Hallam moor wiccaman9 Posted by wiccaman9
30 Jan 16ce

Ladybower Tor / Fieldnotes by wiccaman9

If you take the panorama view , also potentially represented by the penannular for those who might consider the motif as a boundary in a "map " ,the highest horizons ,seen from the site , are the local ones to the west and around to the north north east ,which appear twice as high as Stanage etc . If the "mounds " on the motif represent hills then they are the highest features . tiompan Posted by tiompan
29 Jan 16ce
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