The Modern Antiquarian. Ancient Sites, Stone Circles, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic Mysteries

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Anglesey (County) — Links

Megalithic tour of Anglesey


tjj Posted by tjj
19th February 2015ce

Great Orme and its Environs — News

"Blodwen" comes home!


The 5,000 yr old skeleton found on the Little Orme by quarrymen 123 yrs ago finally comes home to Llandudno and will be the centre of a major exhibition in April.

http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/blodwen-skeleton-returns-north-wales-8655319
Posted by JohnAko
17th February 2015ce
Edited 18th February 2015ce

News

What is the brocken spectre?


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-31447148

A spooky weather effect, which in the past was thought to be a supernatural creature, has been photographed in Glen Coe. But what is the story behind it?

The myth describes him as a Scottish Big Foot, said to loom large in shifting grey cloud on the UK's second highest mountain.

The Big Grey Man of Ben Macdui first came to prominence in the 1920s during a dinner speech at an annual gathering of the Cairngorm Club in Aberdeen. etc .
tiompan Posted by tiompan
17th February 2015ce

Carn-Yr-Arian (Round Barrow(s)) — Fieldnotes

Visited 16/2/15

This may be much more accessible in the future as they are currently starting work clearing the forest here. There were working diggers within 100m of this site creating a new forest clearing and if you use this new track you can get to the cairn without any risk of wet feet.

I took the opportunity today to capture a Google Photosphere so you can have a virtual look around yourselves: https://www.google.com/maps/views/view/109208834756377410190/gphoto/6116463123741184482
Posted by mattbotwood
16th February 2015ce

Orkney — News

Ancient grave found in Orkney


Archaeologists have been excavating the site of a child's grave on an Orkney island.

The grave - which it is believed could be up to 4,000 years old - was uncovered on Sanday's shoreline by winter storms and high tides.

It is thought the skeleton could be that of a child aged between 10 and 12.

The find was made by Carrie Brown, of See Orkney tours, who called in local archaeologists.

Historic Scotland was alerted, and experts were sent to Sanday on Saturday.

The skeleton will be analysed by an osteoarchaeology team in more suitable climatic conditions.

The remains were found on 3 February.



http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-31313519
Howburn Digger Posted by Howburn Digger
15th February 2015ce

Henley Bank (Round Barrow(s)) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Henley Bank</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Henley Bank</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Henley Bank</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Henley Bank</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
15th February 2015ce

Churchdown Hill (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Images

<b>Churchdown Hill</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Churchdown Hill</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Churchdown Hill</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Churchdown Hill</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Churchdown Hill</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Churchdown Hill</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Churchdown Hill</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Churchdown Hill</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Churchdown Hill</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
15th February 2015ce

Leckhampton Hill (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Leckhampton Hill</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
15th February 2015ce

Henley Bank (Round Barrow(s)) — Fieldnotes

Leaving Churchdown Hill by its southeastern slopes, the M5 and various fast-moving main roads now occupy much of the low-lying plain below (18.1.2015).

This barrow is one of very few surviving prehistoric sites below the Cotswolds escarpment. Although there are plenty of examples in various states of disrepair up on the limestone plateau, most of the barrows down in the vale of the Severn have long-ago succumbed to the ravages of agriculture, or they simply never existed.

I've never made it here before, as the combination of A-Road and muddy fields that provide the surrounding landscape look unappealing enough on a map. But the long-awaited visit to Churchdown makes this an obvious enough pairing.

I approach from Brockworth Road to the west. The OS 1/25000 shows a footpath skirting the fields alongside the A417, but when I get to the relevant spot there's no signpost. I take my chance and follow the route around the field edge. This is yet another of those fields of clinging clay that the farms round here specialise in. It's not too bad on the field edge, but at length I get to the point where the map shows the path cutting northeast across the field towards the little wood where the barrow lies. Although only a couple of hundred yards, I seem to have picked up a large proportion of the field's surface by the time I make it to the woodland verge.

From here it's easier going, a narrow track running alongside the woodland. At the northern corner, a very welcoming post informs me that access to the wood is permitted by the landowner, so getting to the barrow is straightforward as long as the vegetation is kind.

The barrow is near the northern edge of the wood. When I get to it, I'm relieved to find it has not been planted. The woodland itself is young, and a space for the barrow has clearly been left open. The barrow itself is rather disappointing, almost flattened and only really obvious as a mound when viewed from the south. However, the woodland setting is really rather nice. The nearby road doesn't intrude and I can imagine that in spring the new growth in the canopy will make for a very pretty spot.

Despite its relatively poor state, the barrow was rich with finds. Gloucestershire HER mentions 14 worked flints and "a fossilised burrow from a marine boring bivalve that had probably been reused as a bead".

I leave through Primrose Vale Farm to the east, realising as I do that access to the woods is possible - and signposted - directly from the farm shop, so if you're coming by car, this is the way to come (there's a car park at the farm shop).

It's not the best barrow you'll ever see, but the rarity of a site in this low-lying landscape makes it worth the effort in itself, with the tranquility of the surrounding woods an added bonus.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
15th February 2015ce

Churchdown Hill (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Fieldnotes

One of two unvisited sites within walking distance of my house, this has niggled and nagged away at me for a few years now. So a beautiful January Sunday (18.1.2015) finally gets me off the sofa to go and have a proper look.

The walk up from Churchdown is straightforward enough, passing the wonderfully named "Criftycraft Lane" on my way. At Churchdown Green the ice makes the tarmac suddenly treacherous, but thankfully it's a short enough bit of uphill skating.

Below the church, the lane is bordered on its right by what appears to be a large bank, the sort of thing that could suggest an inturned entrance to an Iron Age site. However, it could just be a natural crease in the hillside. Overgrown with brambles and scrub, it's not easy to investigate much further.

The lane opens out to a vista of green banks. Not anything ancient unfortunately, just the grassed sides of one of several reservoirs that now fill the centre of the hilltop. Along with quarrying, these may well have destroyed much chance of establishing its prehistoric origins. Round the corner, the church is very striking, perched on top of a huge mound - natural? Hmm.

The corner of the churchyard looks out over the Severn plain with the steep Cotswold escarpment forming its eastern edge. I can count more than half a dozen Iron Age forts and settlements visible from here, with more yet on the Malverns ridge over to the northwest.

Leaving the churchyard and its super-friendly cat familiar, a little gate leads onto a footpath circumnavigating the rim of the hilltop. I'm soon into an area of hideous Cotswold mud, the kind that clings to your boots and adds several pounds. The ground drops fairly steeply, and there appears to be a slight embankment along the top, perhaps suggesting some counterscarping has taken place.

Round to the west the walk would be lovely, under a spacious canopy of deciduous woodland, if it weren't for the continuing hindrance of the mud underfoot. The highest part of the hill is at the southwestern corner, up a slope of particularly slippery mud. Here a toposcope points out the distant Black Mountains, as if their bright white snow covering were not enough today.

The southern side of the hill is the steepest, and there is no obvious sign of anything that could be a man-made or enhanced earthwork here . It is a lovely spot though, as the sun filters through the slender pine trees.

Although nothing about the visit today confirms categorically whether there was a fort here, it would certainly be a fine spot for one, with tremendous visibility in all directions and natural defences from its steep slopes. Iron Age finds have turned up within the site and I'm inclined to believe it more likely than not that it would have been occupied and probably fortified too.

With one itch finally scratched, from here I head off to another one.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
15th February 2015ce

Ballybought (Bullaun Stone) — Fieldnotes

I finally made it to this stone, Ballybought (Baile Bocht) wart stone, after 5 aborted visits, livestock in the large field always putting me off. The stone is about 200 metres into the field from the little bridge that fords the north to south flowing stream, on the eastern side of the small valley.

The ovoid bullaun dominates the large, metre and a half long boulder, at least a foot wide on its longer axis. I didn't feel like testing its depth. There are very faint cupmarks on the boulder too. Lumps of quartzite speckle the granite. The stone seems to have been cut on its south-east edge, though many moons ago.

On leaving I realised there were livestock in the field still, hidden beyond the crest of the hill. Oh well.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
14th February 2015ce
Edited 15th February 2015ce

Cumbria — Links

– mountains of meaning


This blog examines mountain environments from the perspective of landscape archaeology; what people did on and around mountains and how this can inform us about how ancient and not so ancient people used, perceived and interacted with these places.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
13th February 2015ce

Corn Du (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Corn Du</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Corn Du</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Corn Du</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Corn Du</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
11th February 2015ce

Pen-y-Fan (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Pen-y-Fan</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Pen-y-Fan</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Pen-y-Fan</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Pen-y-Fan</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
11th February 2015ce

Cribyn (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Cribyn</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
11th February 2015ce

Glengoulandie (Cup Marked Stone) — Fieldnotes

Couple of brocken spectres from the area . tiompan Posted by tiompan
11th February 2015ce

Glengoulandie (Cup Marked Stone) — Images

<b>Glengoulandie</b>Posted by tiompan<b>Glengoulandie</b>Posted by tiompan tiompan Posted by tiompan
11th February 2015ce

Ballyvoge Beg (Wedge Tomb) — Images

<b>Ballyvoge Beg</b>Posted by Meic<b>Ballyvoge Beg</b>Posted by Meic<b>Ballyvoge Beg</b>Posted by Meic<b>Ballyvoge Beg</b>Posted by Meic<b>Ballyvoge Beg</b>Posted by Meic<b>Ballyvoge Beg</b>Posted by Meic<b>Ballyvoge Beg</b>Posted by Meic<b>Ballyvoge Beg</b>Posted by Meic Meic Posted by Meic
10th February 2015ce

Mallavoge (Stone Row / Alignment) — Fieldnotes

This stone row has very recently been added to the NMS (National Monument Service), but with no details.
We had seen these stones a few years back on a visit to Brow Head but had dismissed them as being modern. So today, we thought that we would take a closer look.
Three large boulders form a line roughly ENE-WSW. They are quite well spaced out. There are extensive views over Crookhaven to the NE and out to Sea to the South.
The ENE and WSW boulders look as though they just sit on the earth, whilst the middle one is earthfast.
There is another large stone slightly South of the row, which may or may not be connected to it.
In my mind, this row has a very modern feel and look to it, but as I mentioned at the begining, The NMS have scheduled it - CO152-010 so who knows
Meic Posted by Meic
10th February 2015ce

Mallavoge (Stone Row / Alignment) — Images

<b>Mallavoge</b>Posted by Meic<b>Mallavoge</b>Posted by Meic<b>Mallavoge</b>Posted by Meic Meic Posted by Meic
10th February 2015ce

Upper Neuadd cairns (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Upper Neuadd cairns</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
10th February 2015ce

Corn Du (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Corn Du</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
10th February 2015ce

Pen-y-Fan (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Pen-y-Fan</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
10th February 2015ce
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