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Gerichtsstätte (Passage Grave) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Gerichtsstätte</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Gerichtsstätte</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Gerichtsstätte</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
19th October 2014ce

Dötlingen (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Dötlingen</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Dötlingen</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Dötlingen</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Dötlingen</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Dötlingen</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Dötlingen</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
19th October 2014ce

Börger 3 — Images

<b>Börger 3</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Börger 3</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Börger 3</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Börger 3</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
19th October 2014ce

Börger 2 (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Börger 2</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Börger 2</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Börger 2</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Börger 2</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
19th October 2014ce

Börger 1 (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Börger 1</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
19th October 2014ce

Rathurlus — Folklore

Explanation of how Nenagh or more accurately this site at Rathurles got its name.

http://www.mocavo.com/A-Social-History-of-Ancient-Ireland-Treating-of-the-Government-Military-System-and-Law-Religion-Learning-and-Art-Trades-Industries-and-Commerce-Manners-Customs-and-Domestic-Life-of-the-Ancient-Irish-People-Volume-2/705637/456

Another here in the journal of the royal society of antiquaries of Ireland http://archive.org/stream/journalofroyalso1906roya/journalofroyalso1906roya_djvu.txt

"The degeneration of the fair, assuming it to have been Aenach Colman, is quite consistent with what we know of the history of the place. Being part of Munster at some early period, it may have been
then the site of the Munster Mor aenach, which afterwards, when Magh Leana passed from the control of the Munsterinen, was transferred else-
where (perhaps to Nenagh, originally Aenach Thete, but later Aenach Urmhumhan, the assembly place of Ormond)"

Under its old name of Aenach Thete it was the scene of a defeat of Brian Boru by Maelseachlainn in the Annals of the Four Masters - being burned during raids in 994 and 1056.
bawn79 Posted by bawn79
19th October 2014ce

Börger 1 (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Börger 1</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Börger 1</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Börger 1</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Börger 1</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
19th October 2014ce

Bargloyer Steinkiste (Cist) — Images

<b>Bargloyer Steinkiste</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Bargloyer Steinkiste</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Bargloyer Steinkiste</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Bargloyer Steinkiste</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Bargloyer Steinkiste</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
19th October 2014ce

Apeldorn — Images

<b>Apeldorn</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Apeldorn</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Apeldorn</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Apeldorn</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Apeldorn</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
19th October 2014ce

Ueffeln (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Ueffeln</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Ueffeln</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Ueffeln</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Ueffeln</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Ueffeln</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
19th October 2014ce

Carreg Cennen (Sacred Well) — Fieldnotes

Carreg Cennen. An evocative name to the (somewhat protruding) ears of an Englishman first brought here by his father during 1983 (Cestyll '83, as I recall), a boy with a head filled with incoherent images of 'something' that perhaps existed before what was quickly becoming, to him, the complete bollocks of organised religion... the hymns we were forced to sing at school.... but took subconscious delight in defying. Even then. Something burning within, something subsumed deep in the folk memory. Ancient Britains. Not desert people. Christianity irrelevant.

I arrive today, in pouring rain, with more than an eye on re-visiting the not so distant (incredibly undervalued) hill fort of Garn Goch. Do so if you can. Parking in the rather busy car park, I wonder if it is actually a good idea to revisit times past? Would the somewhat cynical mind of the 45 year old render the magical experience of the initiate superfluous? In short, er, no. I purchase my ticket and ascend the track to the fortress perched upon its eyrie. The medieval fortifications are easily retrieved from my psyche... their imprint seared upon my impressionable mind years ago. Not so the very attractive lady - with idiosyncratic canine companion and perfect breasts - engaged with capturing the vibe for posterity upon her DSLR. Pure class. Superlatives come as standard at Carreg Cennen, the mind thrown into overdrive, with carnal base thoughts vying for attention with those upon an altogether higher plane. Unfortunately the words do not flow from my brain to the tongue in any coherent manner.... as usual.

So... a rather steep flight of steps descend to a dark passage - lit by loop holes - to access the entrance to (one of) the caves which permeate this carboniferous limestone crag. This is something special, however. Really special indeed. The rough-hewn steps vanish into a more-or-less unfathomable gloom below.... so careful now. The eyes adjust a little, revealing a medieval outer wall, fashioned into 'pigeon holes' to accommodate, well, pigeons - funnily enough - to supplement the castle food supply. Within, a naked gash within the cliff face represents the threshold beyond which a torch will be required. To be fair I've been here before, feeling my way to the cave's terminus in utter darkness during the early 90's. Forgot a torch. And humans so need to appreciate where they are going, do they not? Ok, appreciate, if not necessarily understand.

I've borrowed the Mam C's torch today..... and advance down the narrow, undulating passage toward the very underworld itself. The thought that pre-Ice Age people were laid to rest within here, a proto-chambered tomb if ever there was one, blows my mind, the floor of the cave suddenly descending to afflict a stumble, walls as luminescent as marble, as apparently hydrated as a cascade, yet ironically dry to the touch. I reach the end point of the cave, my heart pounding as if in homage to New Order's iconic Oberheim DMX drum machine, my breath clouding my vision as upon a sub-zero December morning, my camera lens overwhelmed with vapour. Here, upon the right hand flank, has been fashioned a small pool of water, inexorably replenished from water dripping from the roof. I extinguish the torch and eat my lunch in utter darkness, struggling to comprehend how such sensual deprivation can have such an opposite effect?

The flanks of the cave are engraved with graffiti, some inspiringly celebrating love, some utter moronic bollocks. The human experience, then? The instinctive base line and the sublime. I refrain from recording my passage, of course, leaving behind merely a trace of my exhaled carbon dioxide and spilled coffee. Well, distant ancestors were laid to rest here, it has to be said. I ponder for a while and suppose I can see the reason why. Yeah, this place is not really that different from the Pavilland Cave visited earlier this year. If I'm anything to go by, the perceptive visitor's brain appears able to retrieve a fragment of what went before.... sorry, but I can't articulate any more than that. So come and experience for yourself.
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
17th October 2014ce

Rathurlus — Folklore

I checked through the Irish Folklore Commission micro-film from the schools around the area but found very little on the ring-fort.
In one there is a description of "lights" in the fort and in another a "white woman" haunts the fort. However for such a large and impressive monument there seems to be very little about it.
Another describes it as having being built by "the Danes".
In Donovans OS letters it is also referred to locally as having being built by the Danes and that a great battle took place at "Barnaderg" in the vicinity. Barnaderg is noted on the 1840s os map and translates as the "gap of red". This may be a reference to the blood-shed. It also mentions that a great number of bones were found within the fort and again makes reference to a battle.
Unfortunately I was unable to copy Donovans OS letters and so this is from memory. (Looked at 17th Oct 14).
What is unusual is that no mention is made to the "fair of munster" in any of the folklore above.

Please see my flickr account for a link to some further info on Rathurles from "Nenagh & It's Neighbourhood" by EH Sheehan (To download a copy click here) http://www.askaboutireland.ie/aai-files/assets/ebooks/ebooks-2011/nenagh-and-its-neighbourhood/SHEEHAN_NENAGH-AND-ITS-NEIGHBOURHOOD.pdf & History of Ely O'Carroll Territory here https://www.flickr.com/photos/13367662@N06/15534109166/in/photostream
bawn79 Posted by bawn79
17th October 2014ce
Edited 23rd October 2014ce

Rathurles (Standing Stones) — Images

<b>Rathurles</b>Posted by bawn79<b>Rathurles</b>Posted by bawn79<b>Rathurles</b>Posted by bawn79<b>Rathurles</b>Posted by bawn79<b>Rathurles</b>Posted by bawn79 bawn79 Posted by bawn79
17th October 2014ce

Rathurles (Standing Stones) — Fieldnotes

To the north of the tri-vallette ring-fort are two large recumbent blocks of stone.
In the older OS letters they are described as the remains of a druids altar however in the latest description they are described as "gateways" and "Listed in the SMR (1992) and RMP (1998) as piers. These gatepiers are located in the field NE of Rathurles ringfort (TN021-012001). They consist of two large recumbent limestone blocks fomerly used as gatepiers to mark the entrance to the ringfort and are likely to be of nineteenth-century date."
On the old 6" OS maps of the 1840s they are described as "remarkable stones".

To me I'm not sure how they could be described as gate-posts to a ring-fort and I've been trying to identify where this newer description came from. There those appear to have been some work done to the stones and at what date this was completed I don't know. However where these large stones are now located is not near any existing or old field entrance. Why someone would move them to this position I don't know. It seems to me more likely that they are in their original position?

The ring-fort itself is known as "the fair of munster or Ormond" (Ormond comes from the irish for north munster) or an old aonach site. Seemingly it is the reason why the town of Nenagh is located where it is. The thinking being that when the Norman settlers arrived they moved it to a new location.
bawn79 Posted by bawn79
17th October 2014ce

Piran's Round (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Piran's Round</b>Posted by Beebon Posted by Beebon
17th October 2014ce

Sheep Down Long Barrow — Fieldnotes

Visited 14.10.14

As formicaant states the long barrow is easy to visit (being close to the minor road running south from the A35 to Portesham) but there is not much to see.

It has now been reduced to a long low grass mound.

Still worth a look when in the area.
Posted by CARL
17th October 2014ce

Sheep Down (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Miscellaneous

I was able to spot 3 barrows when driving along the minor road to the east. They appeared as rough grass covered mounds.

Access to the barrows can be made via a farm track leading from the road.
Posted by CARL
17th October 2014ce

Bottlebush Down (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

‘Drive by’ 13.10.14

Driving along the B3081 I could spot two of the barrows showing on the O/S map.

Both are rough grass covered mounds.
One is right next to the road and the other is further into a field.
Parking would be difficult on this busy road.
Posted by CARL
17th October 2014ce
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