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Börger 3 — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Börger 3</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
19th October 2014ce

Börger 2 (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Börger 2</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Börger 2</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Börger 2</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Börger 2</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
19th October 2014ce

Börger 1 (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Börger 1</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
19th October 2014ce

Rathurlus — Folklore

Explanation of how Nenagh or more accurately this site at Rathurles got its name.

http://www.mocavo.com/A-Social-History-of-Ancient-Ireland-Treating-of-the-Government-Military-System-and-Law-Religion-Learning-and-Art-Trades-Industries-and-Commerce-Manners-Customs-and-Domestic-Life-of-the-Ancient-Irish-People-Volume-2/705637/456

Another here in the journal of the royal society of antiquaries of Ireland http://archive.org/stream/journalofroyalso1906roya/journalofroyalso1906roya_djvu.txt

"The degeneration of the fair, assuming it to have been Aenach Colman, is quite consistent with what we know of the history of the place. Being part of Munster at some early period, it may have been
then the site of the Munster Mor aenach, which afterwards, when Magh Leana passed from the control of the Munsterinen, was transferred else-
where (perhaps to Nenagh, originally Aenach Thete, but later Aenach Urmhumhan, the assembly place of Ormond)"

Under its old name of Aenach Thete it was the scene of a defeat of Brian Boru by Maelseachlainn in the Annals of the Four Masters - being burned during raids in 994 and 1056.
bawn79 Posted by bawn79
19th October 2014ce

Börger 1 (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Börger 1</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Börger 1</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Börger 1</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Börger 1</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
19th October 2014ce

Bargloyer Steinkiste (Cist) — Images

<b>Bargloyer Steinkiste</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Bargloyer Steinkiste</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Bargloyer Steinkiste</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Bargloyer Steinkiste</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Bargloyer Steinkiste</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
19th October 2014ce

Apeldorn — Images

<b>Apeldorn</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Apeldorn</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Apeldorn</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Apeldorn</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Apeldorn</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
19th October 2014ce

Ueffeln (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Ueffeln</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Ueffeln</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Ueffeln</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Ueffeln</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Ueffeln</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
19th October 2014ce

Carreg Cennen (Sacred Well) — Fieldnotes

Carreg Cennen. An evocative name to the (somewhat protruding) ears of an Englishman first brought here by his father during 1983 (Cestyll '83, as I recall), a boy with a head filled with incoherent images of 'something' that perhaps existed before what was quickly becoming, to him, the complete bollocks of organised religion... the hymns we were forced to sing at school.... but took subconscious delight in defying. Even then. Something burning within, something subsumed deep in the folk memory. Ancient Britains. Not desert people. Christianity irrelevant.

I arrive today, in pouring rain, with more than an eye on re-visiting the not so distant (incredibly undervalued) hill fort of Garn Goch. Do so if you can. Parking in the rather busy car park, I wonder if it is actually a good idea to revisit times past? Would the somewhat cynical mind of the 45 year old render the magical experience of the initiate superfluous? In short, er, no. I purchase my ticket and ascend the track to the fortress perched upon its eyrie. The medieval fortifications are easily retrieved from my psyche... their imprint seared upon my impressionable mind years ago. Not so the very attractive lady - with idiosyncratic canine companion and perfect breasts - engaged with capturing the vibe for posterity upon her DSLR. Pure class. Superlatives come as standard at Carreg Cennen, the mind thrown into overdrive, with carnal base thoughts vying for attention with those upon an altogether higher plane. Unfortunately the words do not flow from my brain to the tongue in any coherent manner.... as usual.

So... a rather steep flight of steps descend to a dark passage - lit by loop holes - to access the entrance to (one of) the caves which permeate this carboniferous limestone crag. This is something special, however. Really special indeed. The rough-hewn steps vanish into a more-or-less unfathomable gloom below.... so careful now. The eyes adjust a little, revealing a medieval outer wall, fashioned into 'pigeon holes' to accommodate, well, pigeons - funnily enough - to supplement the castle food supply. Within, a naked gash within the cliff face represents the threshold beyond which a torch will be required. To be fair I've been here before, feeling my way to the cave's terminus in utter darkness during the early 90's. Forgot a torch. And humans so need to appreciate where they are going, do they not? Ok, appreciate, if not necessarily understand.

I've borrowed the Mam C's torch today..... and advance down the narrow, undulating passage toward the very underworld itself. The thought that pre-Ice Age people were laid to rest within here, a proto-chambered tomb if ever there was one, blows my mind, the floor of the cave suddenly descending to afflict a stumble, walls as luminescent as marble, as apparently hydrated as a cascade, yet ironically dry to the touch. I reach the end point of the cave, my heart pounding as if in homage to New Order's iconic Oberheim DMX drum machine, my breath clouding my vision as upon a sub-zero December morning, my camera lens overwhelmed with vapour. Here, upon the right hand flank, has been fashioned a small pool of water, inexorably replenished from water dripping from the roof. I extinguish the torch and eat my lunch in utter darkness, struggling to comprehend how such sensual deprivation can have such an opposite effect?

The flanks of the cave are engraved with graffiti, some inspiringly celebrating love, some utter moronic bollocks. The human experience, then? The instinctive base line and the sublime. I refrain from recording my passage, of course, leaving behind merely a trace of my exhaled carbon dioxide and spilled coffee. Well, distant ancestors were laid to rest here, it has to be said. I ponder for a while and suppose I can see the reason why. Yeah, this place is not really that different from the Pavilland Cave visited earlier this year. If I'm anything to go by, the perceptive visitor's brain appears able to retrieve a fragment of what went before.... sorry, but I can't articulate any more than that. So come and experience for yourself.
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
17th October 2014ce

Rathurlus — Folklore

I checked through the Irish Folklore Commission micro-film from the schools around the area but found very little on the ring-fort.
In one there is a description of "lights" in the fort and in another a "white woman" haunts the fort. However for such a large and impressive monument there seems to be very little about it.
Another describes it as having being built by "the Danes".
In Donovans OS letters it is also referred to locally as having being built by the Danes and that a great battle took place at "Barnaderg" in the vicinity. Barnaderg is noted on the 1840s os map and translates as the "gap of red". This may be a reference to the blood. It also mentions that a great number of bones were found within the fort and again makes reference to a battle.
Unfortunately I was unable to copy Donovans OS letters and so this is from memory. (Looked at today).
What is unusual is that no mention is made to the "fair of munster" in any of the folklore above".

Please see my flickr account for a link to some further info on Rathurles from "Nenagh & It's Neighbourhood" by EH Sheehan (To download a copy click here) http://www.askaboutireland.ie/aai-files/assets/ebooks/ebooks-2011/nenagh-and-its-neighbourhood/SHEEHAN_NENAGH-AND-ITS-NEIGHBOURHOOD.pdf & History of Ely O'Carroll Territory here https://www.flickr.com/photos/13367662@N06/15534109166/in/photostream
bawn79 Posted by bawn79
17th October 2014ce
Edited 18th October 2014ce

Rathurles (Standing Stones) — Images

<b>Rathurles</b>Posted by bawn79<b>Rathurles</b>Posted by bawn79<b>Rathurles</b>Posted by bawn79<b>Rathurles</b>Posted by bawn79<b>Rathurles</b>Posted by bawn79 bawn79 Posted by bawn79
17th October 2014ce

Rathurles (Standing Stones) — Fieldnotes

To the north of the tri-vallette ring-fort are two large recumbent blocks of stone.
In the older OS letters they are described as the remains of a druids altar however in the latest description they are described as "gateways" and "Listed in the SMR (1992) and RMP (1998) as piers. These gatepiers are located in the field NE of Rathurles ringfort (TN021-012001). They consist of two large recumbent limestone blocks fomerly used as gatepiers to mark the entrance to the ringfort and are likely to be of nineteenth-century date."
On the old 6" OS maps of the 1840s they are described as "remarkable stones".

To me I'm not sure how they could be described as gate-posts to a ring-fort and I've been trying to identify where this newer description came from. There those appear to have been some work done to the stones and at what date this was completed I don't know. However where these large stones are now located is not near any existing or old field entrance. Why someone would move them to this position I don't know. It seems to me more likely that they are in their original position?

The ring-fort itself is known as "the fair of munster or Ormond" (Ormond comes from the irish for north munster) or an old aonach site. Seemingly it is the reason why the town of Nenagh is located where it is. The thinking being that when the Norman settlers arrived they moved it to a new location.
bawn79 Posted by bawn79
17th October 2014ce

Piran's Round (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Piran's Round</b>Posted by Beebon Posted by Beebon
17th October 2014ce

Sheep Down Long Barrow — Fieldnotes

Visited 14.10.14

As formicaant states the long barrow is easy to visit (being close to the minor road running south from the A35 to Portesham) but there is not much to see.

It has now been reduced to a long low grass mound.

Still worth a look when in the area.
Posted by CARL
17th October 2014ce

Sheep Down (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Miscellaneous

I was able to spot 3 barrows when driving along the minor road to the east. They appeared as rough grass covered mounds.

Access to the barrows can be made via a farm track leading from the road.
Posted by CARL
17th October 2014ce

Purlands Farm (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Miscellaneous

Just to add that despite being close to the A35 I could see no sign of the barrows when driving past due to the high hedge.

Perhaps they can be seen from the road in the winter?
Posted by CARL
17th October 2014ce

Bottlebush Down (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

‘Drive by’ 13.10.14

Driving along the B3081 I could spot two of the barrows showing on the O/S map.

Both are rough grass covered mounds.
One is right next to the road and the other is further into a field.
Parking would be difficult on this busy road.
Posted by CARL
17th October 2014ce

Oakley Down (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Miscellaneous

‘Drive by’ 13.10.14

Several of the barrows making up this cemetery can be seen when driving along the very busy A354.
Parking would be a problem if opting for a closer look.
Posted by CARL
17th October 2014ce

Lanceborough King Barrow (Round Barrow(s)) — Fieldnotes

Viewed from Maiden Castle 14.10.14

This is a very large barrow and can be easily seen on the road leading to Maiden Castle car park and from the car park itself. However, the best view is from above, from the ramparts of Maiden Castle.

I am not sure which direction to take if you wanted a closer look as the barrow is surrounded by fields in crop. As far as I know there is no public right of way to the barrow.
Posted by CARL
17th October 2014ce

Maiden Castle (Dorchester) (Hillfort) — Fieldnotes

Visited 14.10.14

I had previously visited this iconic site a few years ago but then I was short of time and only had chance to explore a short section of the mightily impressive ramparts. This time would be different as it is a morning visit and I could take my time – allowing for the fact that Karen would be waiting for me sat in the car!

It is a 5 minute walk from the car park, up the path, and through an original entrance of the hillfort. You then come to the first of several information boards scattered around the site. This directs your attention to the surviving low bank of what is left of the long barrow. This would be very easy to miss if you weren’t specifically looking out for it.

The rain (thankfully) had eased today and I was able to walk around (in a clockwise direction) in comfort. Although the skies were a menacing grey there was little wind and the temperature was very mild for the time of year. There were only two other people visiting the site, one was walking her dog and the other looked like a student who was making notes and sketches as she walked around.

The ramparts are superb and must have looked amazing in their prime, topped with a huge wooden palisade. Even the mighty Roman army must have been (at least a bit) intimidated when confronting this hillfort - although we all know the eventual outcome! The hillfort dominates the surrounding countryside and as you walk around the defences there are good views to be had in every direction.

As I walked around I spotted 3 circular shapes in the grass, given away by a ring of darker grass. Were these the outlines of huts? They certainly looked to be about the right size. My next stop was the information board at the remains of the Roman temple – well worth a look.

I then stopped at the eastern entrance to the hillfort where I feel the defences are at their most impressive. (This is the section of the site I explored on my previous visit).
The two information boards (one broken) explain about the complex defences and the discovery of the pit of sling shots and mass grave found here. I was also able to spot what looked like the remains of a round barrow.

I continued my walk around the site until I ended up back where I started. Walking back down towards the car park the large barrow in the fields beyond looked particularly impressive. It took me just over an hour to complete the circular walk. There are worse ways to spend an hour of your life. When I got back to the car Karen had fallen asleep so I gave her a bit of a fright when I opened the car door!

This is a famous E.H. site but it has not been commercialised (like others) and you can happily wander about the hillfort pretty much wherever and whenever you want. I have visited many hillforts over the years but in terms of sheer scale and impressiveness there is nothing to compare with Maiden Castle.

This is one of those sites which is worth travelling a long way to see. If you get the chance to visit, do so. You won’t be disappointed.
Posted by CARL
17th October 2014ce

Carreg Cennen (Sacred Well) — Links

Carreg Cennen Official Website


To be fair a lot of websites designed to draw in punters (that I've seen) are not that helpful to the average member (or perceptive visitor) to TMA. Not saying TMA folk are more intelligent; rather that we perhaps use what we have to a greater degree. The brain requires exercise, after all.

So rather pleasantly surprised that this DIY effort is refreshingly informative. If you are lucky enough to be blessed with children... this is truly an ideal site to fire the young psyche. Can there be a more precious gift a parent can bestow? Mine was. Eternal thanks to my father - now an old man - for taking his son here back in the early 80's and freaking out that mind full of swirling hormones. This is a place of legend, of life, death and every state in-between! And ... if you aren't a parent .... join the club.... I'd wager no other castle in these Isles offers quite what is available here for the curious independent visitor.

Hey, the Llewleyns (the farm - and castle owners) even organise weddings. What better way for two people deeply in love to cement their commitment to each other than by venturing to the well at the terminus of the cave. Searing emotion with no hiding place. Jeez. What a dream. Photos here would impress Gladman no end, believe me. Having sat with my hand in the pool of water perculating down from the roof in utter darkness... my heart pounding like the drum machine from Blue Monday... I can well understand our ancestors (apparent) connection with this crazy, spinning globe. There is an awful lot we can learn from the past.
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
16th October 2014ce

Cowdown Farm (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

Directions:
North of Newton Barrow on the western side of the A360.

‘Drive by’ 13.10.14

Despite these being nowhere to park the barrow can be easily seen when driving past.

It is approximately 1 metre high x 10 metres across.
Posted by CARL
16th October 2014ce

Winterbourne Stoke Long Barrow — Miscellaneous

‘Drive by’ 13.10.14

After visiting the new visitor centre at Stonehenge I kept an eye out for this longbarrow on our way south. I have known about this site for a long time but had never actually seen it. I am pleased to say that it is very easy to spot when driving past. There is no chance of parking near the longbarrow. I am not sure where the closest parking would be – the visitor centre main car park perhaps?
Posted by CARL
16th October 2014ce

Stonehenge (Stone Circle) — Miscellaneous

Visited 13.10.14

Since the closing of the road / opening of the new visitor’s centre I had been keen to re-visit Stonehenge. Not to look at the stones but the new exhibition centre.

The visitor’s centre is very easy to access and looked quite impressive on the approach to the large car park. Despite the foul weather the car park had several coaches and many cars already parked up. Several groups of school children excitedly waited with their teachers for their turn to board one of the land trains.

Karen went for a much needed coffee whilst I headed for the ticket booth. The lady looked a little surprised when I said I only wanted a ticket for the exhibition centre and not to see the stones themselves but a ticket was duly issued. It is nearly £20.00 per adult to see the stones and exhibition – I have no idea how much it would be to just see the exhibition. Fortunately I have a CADW card so admission was free for me.

As you enter the building you first come to a 360 degree surround visual display of what it is like to be in the centre of the stones at the mid-summer / mid-winter solstice. The film is run on a loop and I thought it was well done although it only lasts a few minutes (ship ‘em in – ship ‘em out) came to mind.

From here you enter the main exhibition room which has another large visual presentation along the far wall and several displays along the other walls. There are (I think) 8 free standing glass display cabinets in the centre of the room which were really interesting. I particularly liked the pretty ‘ceremonial’ mace head. The ‘reconstructed’ head of the controversial skeleton on display is excellent and very life-like. I spent quite a long time moving slowly from cabinet to cabinet.
There is a lot to see – pottery, bone tools, stone tools, flint arrow heads, flint scrapers etc.

I then went out the back door to have a look around the reconstructed round houses. The rain continued to pour and as such there were few people about. The replica (fiberglass) megalith on the wooden sledge was impressive and gives a good idea of the scale involved in moving these massive stones. You can even test your strength in trying to move it!

There was a private event going on in one of the huts and a flint knapping demonstration in another. I spent a bit of time chatting to an E.H. chap in the other round house who explained to me how they built the hut and showed me the clever way they made the door. A small mouse scuttled past – not a bad place to live!

I then headed for the café to meet up with Karen and we finished our visit with a look around the shop. The shop is much bigger than the old one and you can buy just about anything with a Stonehenge theme – a Stonehenge snow globe anyone? Some of the prices were eye watering and clearly aimed at the overseas market – an engraved glass vase £500.00, a limited edition teddy bear for £110.00………. I decided not to bother!

All in all I was very impressed with the new visitor centre and it is certainly much better than the old one. However, I did come away with a few negatives.
Firstly, with the exception of the chap I was speaking to in the round house, all the staff I encountered seemed quite miserable? There was little interaction with visitors and very few smiles to be seen. Everything seemed a bit much trouble. I know not everyone is happy in the job all the time but it is a lot of money to visit Stonehenge so a smile and a friendly face wouldn’t go amiss!

Also, when we were sat in the café we looked outside to see children trying to keep out of the rain (and keep warm) whilst eating their sandwiches. Why hasn’t E.H. provided a ‘school room’ where children can eat their sandwiches in the warm and dry on days like today? I am sure Stonehenge generates enough income to pay for one. Most large ‘attractions’ (which is what Stonehenge is) have these facilities. Perhaps I am doing a disservice and they do have one but I didn’t see it?

Even if you have been before the new visitor centre / exhibition room makes Stonehenge a place to re-visit. Just make sure you take plenty of money with you.
Posted by CARL
16th October 2014ce

Marden Henge (and Hatfield Barrow) — Fieldnotes

Visited 13.10.14

I first visited this site a few years ago but on that occasion I was in a rush and I (somehow) missed the information board. I had been meaning to revisit ever since.

This time I had Karen with me and it didn’t take her long to spot the info board. It is the other side of a wooden stile giving access from the road to the small field owned by English Heritage.
The heavy rain didn't help when trying to read the information.

As has previously been said there is very little left of the henge to see - a low, arcing grass bank.

Although what remains of the henge obviously needs to be protected I am not sure why E.H. has this site on their advertised list of ‘places to visit’.

It is a bit out of the way and I am sure the average visitor would be somewhat disappointed by what they find.

There are certainly other much better preserved henges people could visit and appreciate.
Posted by CARL
16th October 2014ce

Dun Cnoc a'Sga (Stone Fort / Dun) — Images

<b>Dun Cnoc a'Sga</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Cnoc a'Sga</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Cnoc a'Sga</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
15th October 2014ce
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