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Moel y Gest (Hillfort) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Moel y Gest</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
22nd May 2016ce

Curn Barrow (Long Barrow) — Miscellaneous

Details of barrow on Pastscape

[SU 5202 8348] Tumulus [O.E.] (1) Curn Barrow, Blewbury. A long barrow Lat. 51 32' 51" Long. 1 14' 59" a hundred and thirty feet long oriented due east and west. It appears to have been under plough which would account for its low elevation and absence of ditches. There are no signs of it being disturbed. (2) This mound was excavated by H.H. Coghlan and C.F.B. Marshall in 1935 who formed no trace of ditches, portholes or pottery. The age and purpose of the mound was not determined, but it is probably of recent date. (3) This mound has been completely destroyed by the construction of racehorse gallops. (4)
SU 5201 8351 O.G.S. Crawford, 1921: notes long barrow, 135ft. x 60ft., 3ft. high. Not certainly a long barrow - field investigation, A.Upson, 1977. (5) This feature is visible on aerial photographs. The cropmark shows two ditches flanking a mound, resembling a long barrow. However a similar cropmark has been made to the northeast by modern rifle butts, and this feature may also be a modern feature associated with Churn Rifle Range, located 400m to the southeast. (6)
Chance Posted by Chance
22nd May 2016ce

The Hoar Stone I (Chambered Tomb) — Miscellaneous

Details of long barrow on Pastscape

(SP 45782412) Hoar Stone (NR) (1) A large, flat irregularly shaped sandstone boulder known locally as the Hoar Stone (a), is surrounded by five fir trees at the end of an avenue of beech trees. It measures 3.2m long E-W by 2.7m wide and is 0.8m thick. It has the appearance of a Burial Chamber capstone, but as it is slightly embedded in the ground and there is no trace of a surrounding mound there is no supporting evidence for this supposition. Published survey (25") revised. See G.P.(a) (2)
Chance Posted by Chance
22nd May 2016ce

The Hoar Stone II (Chambered Tomb) — Miscellaneous

Details of long barrow on Pastscape

(SP 46432474) Hoar Stone (NR) (Remains of) (1) 'A long barrow with some broken stones at its east end: these broken stones are probably the remains of a burial chamber'. (2) Listed under chambered tombs and described as a long mound (at least 50 ft), E/W, with a heap of smashed stone at the east. A 19th century reference speaks of 'two side-pieces and a lintel', possibly either a simple terminal chamber or a blind entrance. (The name Hoar Stone cannot be confirmed). (3)
'The Hoar Stone, formerly called Maiden's Bower, about which there were superstitions, so that it was deliberately broken up. Mr Hall, owner of Barton Abbey, had the pieces collected into a heap'. (4)
At SP 46422474 there is a low, nearly circular mound some 11.0m N-S by 9.5m E-W and 0.5m high. Its centre consists of a mass of broken sandstone, which is presumably the remains of the Hoar Stone or burial chamber. A vague, unsurveyable ground swelling stretches away to the NW, and may represent the site of the lond mound mentioned by Daniel (2) and Powell (3). Mr Hall (4) is no longer at Barton Abbey, the site is known locally as Hoar Stone, and the only feature hereabouts with a name resembling 'Maiden's Bower' is the wood centred at SP 461235 (a). Published survey (25') revised. (5)
Chance Posted by Chance
22nd May 2016ce

Yr Wyddfa (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Yr Wyddfa</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
22nd May 2016ce

Blawearie Cairn (Kerbed Cairn) — Images

<b>Blawearie Cairn</b>Posted by thelonious<b>Blawearie Cairn</b>Posted by thelonious<b>Blawearie Cairn</b>Posted by thelonious<b>Blawearie Cairn</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
22nd May 2016ce

Old Bewick (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art) — Images

<b>Old Bewick</b>Posted by thelonious<b>Old Bewick</b>Posted by thelonious<b>Old Bewick</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
22nd May 2016ce

Old Bewick Hillfort — Images

<b>Old Bewick Hillfort</b>Posted by thelonious<b>Old Bewick Hillfort</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
22nd May 2016ce

Hepburn Crags Camp (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Hepburn Crags Camp</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
22nd May 2016ce

Hepburn Moor (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Hepburn Moor</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
22nd May 2016ce

Ros Castle (Cup Marked Stone) — Images

<b>Ros Castle</b>Posted by thelonious<b>Ros Castle</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
22nd May 2016ce

Blawearie Cairn (Kerbed Cairn) — Fieldnotes

30/04/2016 - It was supposed to be a quick bob up Ros Castle and back on the way to Wooler but this area had other ideas for us. We started from the car park just past Hepburn. Short walk up the road and then a climb up to Ros Castle. The views from here were good. We had just driven down from Aberdeen in the morning and had made better time than I thought we would. A quick look at the map showed a hillfort, cup and ring marked rocks and a cairn to the south. With still plenty of day left, we left Ros Castle to take a look.

It's a nice walk over Hepburn Moor to Blawearie Cairn. The cairn is very good. I can't think of another like it that I have visited before. Great big stones surrounding a ring made of small stones (containing cists) with a small cairn of stones in the middle. The location is good and the whole site has a very peaceful feeling to it. I liked it very much.

We carried on to the excellent cup and ring marked stones and hillfort at Old Bewick.

On the way back we just had to visit this cairn again as the sun was still shinning and the stones did look good. Finally we left to head back to the car via the Hillfort at Hepburn Crags.

What should have been a half hour walk turned into a 10 mile plus day out with hillforts, cup and ring marked rocks and cairns in a wonderful landscape. I love days like this.
thelonious Posted by thelonious
22nd May 2016ce

Penycloddiau (Hillfort) — Links

Why prehistoric Welsh people built so many forts on hills


"The language of these things was established in the early 20th Century when we were fighting a lot of wars: hillforts, guard chambers," Gale says, a little ruefully. "We're stuck with these terms. But I think they were much more complicated than just being military or defensive."
moss Posted by moss
22nd May 2016ce

Cashtal yn Ard (Chambered Cairn) — Fieldnotes

Helpfully signposted off the A2 in the village of Glen Mona this is easy to find though the single-track road is very narrow with few passing-places and there's a ford to cross before the final section. As Kammer says, parking is tight; given that I'd found a postcard with a picture of the monument, and it's clearly the biggest of its kind on the island, I had expected a layby at least but hey, I'm not complaining, I'm just glad to have made it here before the rain starts with the wind whistling through the high branches in the copse of tall trees nearby lending the site an appropriately ethereal atmosphere. My only real gripe is that the surrounding fence is just a little too close (shades of Torhousekie and Cairnholy in Galloway), it would be nicer if the site were a bit more open like its better-preserved English brethren at West Kennet and Wayland's Smithy. I'd had the same feeling earlier in the day at The Mull Circle, another fine monument seeming just a tad hemmed-in by its fence. ironstone Posted by ironstone
22nd May 2016ce

Reenkilla (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Reenkilla</b>Posted by meg-y Posted by meg-y
21st May 2016ce

Kirkhaugh (Round Barrow(s)) — Links

Altogether Archaeology: Kirkhaugh Cairn Geophysical survey, 2014.


PDF file.

"Summary: This report presents the results of geophysical surveys conducted as part of the
North Pennines AONB Partnership’s ‘Altogether Archaeology’ community project at
Kirkhaugh in Tynedale. The works comprised detailed geomagnetic and earth
resistance surveys over a Bell beaker barrow prior to renewed excavation; the site
had been partially excavated in 1935."
Hob Posted by Hob
21st May 2016ce

Reenkilla (Stone Circle) — Fieldnotes

This four poster, sadly threatened by trees, lies on an island marked Knockacappul on the OS map, in Kilmakillog harbour on the south shore of the Kenmare River. We were informed that it is owned by Lauragh Gardens, but didn’t check.

You can get across to the island at low tide wearing wellington boots, or paddling, but be warned that the channel is over a metre deep at high tide, and the water moves quickly with the tide running. We used the tide tables for Bantry Bay, and crossed 40 minutes before low tide there (ankle-deep at worst), which gave us more than enough time on the island to get back safely with the water apparently no deeper.

To get there, drive past the post office at Lauragh (at the northern end of the Healy Pass) in the direction of Ardgroom, over the stone bridge, and turn left on the road signposted to Shronebirrane circle. After a few hundred metres there’s a driveway on the right, with a gate a short way up, leading to a large house. This lies about 100 metres from the best crossing point, though it’s not easy to get over the fence on the opposite side of the road (the access gate being completely out of the question) and then through the trees.

We stepped over the fence about 50 metres further along the road, where the bank drops, walked back to a point level with the driveway, and struck out for the island, eventually coming upon a ditch that leads to the channel and crossing point.

It’s an easy drop off the bank - but be careful of slipping on the seaweed that covers the rocks. The circle is in the trees, slightly to the south of the centre of the island, just short of where the trees thin out. It has one very tall stone and a very low stone at north, and two others of medium height at the south.

There’s an outlier some 13 metres to the north, hidden from the circle by closely packed trees. We also noted a large stone (probably not an outcrop, perhaps a fallen outlier?) about 35 metres to the east.

To celebrate a safe crossing, and actually finding the stones, we treated ourselves to a delicious coffee and freshly baked pastries at the post office/café at Lauragh.
Posted by meg-y
21st May 2016ce

Reenkilla (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Reenkilla</b>Posted by meg-y<b>Reenkilla</b>Posted by meg-y<b>Reenkilla</b>Posted by meg-y Posted by meg-y
21st May 2016ce

Burn Moor Complex — Fieldnotes

Once more the weather Gods smile on me; looking at the forecast a few days earlier it was so grim I toyed with the notion of postponing my visit planned a couple of months beforehand. I'm so glad I didn't; to echo previous comments, and allowing for Julian's need to limit the number of sites featured in TMA, I still can't quite understand why this amazing complex didn't make the cut. To employ a term I'm sure he'd approve of, it's a veritable megalithic mindfuck of a place, the moorland scattered with cairns and circles in various states of ruination/preservation. On this wondrously sunny afternoon I can't think of anywhere better to be, Scafell Pike looming majestically over the wide sweep of the landscape within which these monuments sit. With my customary inability to read a map correctly I not only take the wrong (and very steep) left-hand route up the hillside (instead of the gentler path to the right of the gate out of Boot) but also go left instead of right at the top, certain that the circles lie in that direction. When fruitless encounters with bits of rock sticking randomly out of the moorland scrub fail to produce any sighting of the object(s) of my quest, I take heed of the advice given to me by the proprietor of The Boot Inn to 'get up on one of the lumps and bumps' and spot what just HAS to be a stone circle way off in the distance to the east. The nearer I get, the more it reveals itself as White Moss, a beautiful little circle, much-better preserved than I'd hoped and the perfect introduction to this wonderful complex. It reminds me very much of Machrie Moor albeit without the big showstopping monoliths that lend that site its aura; here, that's provided by the stupendous views, the setting of the circles operating as a focal point for the aforementioned Scafell Pike and other surrounding hills (cf Castlerigg). To my eyes it looks very much as if the line of sight through White Moss and its more ruined companion is designed to draw your eyes towards the gap through which the sea is visible far away to the west. Brat's Hill is big circumference-wise even though its many stones are smallish and might be less visible later in the summer when the scrub's grown a bit more. The two Low Longrigg circles are a bit more battered and not immediately easy to spot but do provide a wonderful vantage point for views back towards the others. I end up spending a couple of hours wandering backwards and forwards between all the circles, the only person in this vast landscape, thrilled to bits and marvelling at my good fortune in being able to enjoy it in such perfect conditions. I leave with huge reluctance and a fervent desire to communicate the majesty of this site to the world at large. If you've thought about going but haven't got round to it yet, start making plans now, you won't regret it. It's not the most accessible of sites but the effort required isn't that great when set against the pleasure to be gained. ironstone Posted by ironstone
21st May 2016ce

Doddington Moor Quarry Site (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art) — Images

<b>Doddington Moor Quarry Site</b>Posted by thelonious<b>Doddington Moor Quarry Site</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
21st May 2016ce

Lisbanagher (Rath) — Folklore

Quite close to this school on the top of a hill there is a fort which is situated in the townland of Lisbanagher.

Formerly the fort was surrounded by a wall which is now crumbled to heaps of stones, and on this there are trees growing.

It is said that chiefs lived there long ago. In the middle of the fort the chiefs used have castles, but there is no trace of these castles now.
Some chiefs had a good deal of money and used have three walls around their castles and smaller chiefs used have two walls and smaller still used have one wall for protection from their enemies.

The people are in awe of these forts because they say they are inhabited by fairies.

I heard the following story told about the fort.

One morning Mrs Morrison who lives near the fort, got up early. She went to the door and looked out and was surprised to see a great many tiny little men with little creels on their backs coming down to the bog for turf. She went into the house again and said that she got up too early.
From the Schools Collection of the 1930s, being digitised at Duchas.ie.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
21st May 2016ce

Doddington Stone Circle — Images

<b>Doddington Stone Circle</b>Posted by thelonious<b>Doddington Stone Circle</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
21st May 2016ce

Doddington Moor Quarry Site (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art) — Fieldnotes

01/05/2016 - In the end I gave up looking for this one and decided to make my way back to the path through the heather. Of course, as soon as I stopped looking the rock appeared at my feet. Sometimes you can try too hard, better just to let fate decide :-)

This was my favourite rock on the hill (which is covered in cup and ring marked stones). The rings are nice and dobby. It's worth the effort and good fun trying to find.
thelonious Posted by thelonious
21st May 2016ce

Doddington Stone Circle — Fieldnotes

01/05/2016 - I'd been looking forward to this one. A quick look at the map showed a hill jam packed with stuff - cup and ring marked rocks, hillforts, settlements and even a stone circle.

We started from Wooler. Walking over Weetwood Moor via the St Cuthbert Way (passing a few cairns on top) then crossing the Weetwood bridge to start the climb up Dod Law. Good paths all the way.

After reading the fieldnotes on here, I was a little worried that there wouldn't be any stones still standing. Seemed like another one had fallen each time someone visited. Pleased to say that the one remaining upright stone is still hanging in there. I would loved to have seen this one complete. It's a lovely little circle and a fine spot.

We left the circle behind to make our way uphill, looking for cup and ring and visiting the forts on top. Fantatsic hill.

Looped back to Wooler via the rock art stones on Weetwood Moor (great site). Good day out.
thelonious Posted by thelonious
21st May 2016ce

Garleigh Hill (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Garleigh Hill</b>Posted by thelonious<b>Garleigh Hill</b>Posted by thelonious<b>Garleigh Hill</b>Posted by thelonious<b>Garleigh Hill</b>Posted by thelonious<b>Garleigh Hill</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
21st May 2016ce

Garleigh Hill (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

05/05/2016 - Standing inside Lordenshaws hillfort, just looking around at the view, I thought we were done for the day. Then I turned to face Garleigh Hill. The little white trigpoint seem to call out to me and the rocky side of the hill looked just to good to pass up on. Easy walk across and lots of interesting rocks to look at on the short climb up. The cairn is just next to the trigpoint. Large capstone visible. A fine way to end the day.

Old OS maps have stone circles marked on them at the top. I guess this is just the cairn. Anyone know anymore?
thelonious Posted by thelonious
21st May 2016ce

Lordenshaw (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art) — Images

<b>Lordenshaw</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
21st May 2016ce

Lordenshaws Hillfort — Images

<b>Lordenshaws Hillfort</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
21st May 2016ce

Lordenshaw (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art) — Images

<b>Lordenshaw</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
21st May 2016ce

Lordenshaw (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art) — Fieldnotes

05/05/2016 - We parked at the Lordenshaws car park really just to have a walk on the Simonside Hills. Once there we realised that maybe we were heading in the wrong direction! The 1:50000 OS map doesn't give that much away but a quick glance at the 1:25000 revealed a hillside full of megalithic wonder. Luckily we had all day so we chose Simonside first, leaving the afternoon free to roam the tops on the other side of the road.

The hillside, topped with a great hillfort, is just full of rocks with markings on the them. First up to the big one. Great rock art and the location is fantastic. Close views of the Simonside Hills and The Cheviots looking fine in the distance. After that we spent the rest of the time there just wandering around looking at random stones and taking in the scenery.

So much to see but the one that will stay with me is the Channel Rock. On the far side of the hillfort is this most fantastic rock. It's huge and has this channel in it that has to be seen. I can't really explain why I loved it so much but I just found the groove and the smooth surface of the rock so pleasing to the eye.

Top site. If you go (and you should) make a day of it. So much to see.
thelonious Posted by thelonious
21st May 2016ce

Tosson Hill (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Tosson Hill</b>Posted by thelonious<b>Tosson Hill</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
20th May 2016ce

Tosson Hill (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

05/05/2016 - Nice walk over the Simonside Hills from Lordenshaws car park. I think I passed about 5 decent cairns on the way over. The one on Tosson Hill (highest top of Simonside Hills) is a good one. Great view north to The Cheviots. thelonious Posted by thelonious
20th May 2016ce

Bob Pyle's Studdie (Natural Rock Feature) — Images

<b>Bob Pyle's Studdie</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
20th May 2016ce

Simonside (Sacred Hill) — Images

<b>Simonside</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
20th May 2016ce
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