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Dyffryn Mymbyr (Stone Circle) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Dyffryn Mymbyr</b>Posted by postman<b>Dyffryn Mymbyr</b>Posted by postman<b>Dyffryn Mymbyr</b>Posted by postman<b>Dyffryn Mymbyr</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
24th April 2015ce

Gallaunmore (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Gallaunmore</b>Posted by bogman<b>Gallaunmore</b>Posted by bogman bogman Posted by bogman
24th April 2015ce

Bartlow Hills (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Bartlow Hills</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bartlow Hills</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bartlow Hills</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
24th April 2015ce

Llorfa (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Llorfa</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
24th April 2015ce

Pen y Gadair Fawr (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Pen y Gadair Fawr</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Pen y Gadair Fawr</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
24th April 2015ce

Pen Cerrig-Calch (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Pen Cerrig-Calch</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Pen Cerrig-Calch</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Pen Cerrig-Calch</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Pen Cerrig-Calch</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
23rd April 2015ce

Y Garn (Pumlumon) (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Y Garn (Pumlumon)</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
23rd April 2015ce

Graig Ddu (Y Gamriw North-East Ridge) (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Graig Ddu (Y Gamriw North-East Ridge)</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
23rd April 2015ce

Carnethy Hill (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Carnethy Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Carnethy Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Carnethy Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
23rd April 2015ce

Picws Du, Y Mynydd Du (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Picws Du, Y Mynydd Du</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Picws Du, Y Mynydd Du</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Picws Du, Y Mynydd Du</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Picws Du, Y Mynydd Du</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
23rd April 2015ce

Grimsbury Castle (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Grimsbury Castle</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Grimsbury Castle</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
23rd April 2015ce

Weatherby Castle (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Weatherby Castle</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
23rd April 2015ce

Merrivale Stone Circle — Fieldnotes

Visited 13.4.15

It is only a short walk from the stone rows to the circle. The tall (over head height) outliner can be seen from the rows but not the stones forming the circle itself.

I counted 11 stones and walked (as I always seem to do) in an anti-clockwise direction around them, touching each stone I passed (something else I always seem to do)

This is a nice, rather than spectacular, stone circle and is well worth visiting. One piece of the complicated prehistoric jigsaw that is Merrivale.

Across the way (other side of B3357) I suddenly noticed a large black cloud of smoke. A fire had somehow broken out (I didn’t see anyone) and was spreading through the tinder dry bracken. Fortunately it soon burnt itself out before too much damage was done.

Merrivale is yet another fantastic ‘must see’ site in the Devon / Cornwall border area.

N.B.
First TMA notes for this site in 9 years?
How very odd.
Posted by CARL
23rd April 2015ce

The Plague Market At Merrivale (Multiple Stone Rows / Avenue) — Fieldnotes

Visited 13.4.15

Directions:
On the B3357 (east of Tavistock). Not sign posted but large parking area.


It was hot in the car and it was good to get out in the fresh air and stretch our legs. I led the children up the slope which soon brought us out onto the two stone rows. I rarely get the chance to visit a stone row so I was particularly looking forward to visiting Merrivale.

The stone rows certainly didn’t disappoint. The children opted to take their shoes and socks off and play in the leat whilst I walked the entire length of both rows – something I am sure most people who visit this site does! I imagine that it wet weather the ground would be quite boggy – but not today. The larger stones at the end of each row are an obvious start/finish point for whatever activities were once carried out here?

The cist in the middle of the southern row is well worth checking out.

From the row the tall standing stone can be seen. That was my next port of call.
Posted by CARL
23rd April 2015ce

Hound Tor (Cist) — Fieldnotes

Visited 17.4.15

Directions:
There is a large car park next to a minor road north off the B3387 – northeast of Widecombe in the Moor. Hound Tor and its medieval village is not sign posted.


To be honest my main reason for visiting Hound Tor was to see the deserted medieval village (E.H. site). Obviously this also gave me the opportunity to visit Hound Tor itself and the adjacent cairn circle and cist. This was the last day of our holiday and I was keen to make the most of it!

Karen opted to stay at the car with the girls whilst Dafydd and myself headed up across the moor towards Hound Tor. Although the Tor itself is obvious there are no signs or path to the medieval village which surprised me as it is an E.H. site. (In Scotland a site like this would have been marked by poles)

We soon reached the Tor and had a good look around. We then headed down the other side and luckily we spotted the cairn/cist pretty much straight away. Approximately two thirds of the kerb stones remain and both ends and one long side of the cist. Bizarrely, a large plastic model of a USA space rocket had been placed in the cist! Dafydd enjoyed taking this home!

From here we (eventually) found the village and then headed back over the Tor to the car park. Because it took us so long to find the village we got back to the car a lot later than I expected. Apparently the girls had been playing up and Karen was less than happy.
Time to head home…………….
Posted by CARL
23rd April 2015ce

Grimspound & Hookney Tor — Fieldnotes

Visited 13.4.15

Directions:
South of the B3212 (sign posted)


Although the site is sign posted from the main road, the appropriate parking place isn’t. Best bet is to follow Pure Joy’s directions.

I wasn’t expecting the stone path up to the site and it was a lovely (and surprisingly easy) walk from the parking area to the site. The weather was fantastic, hot sunshine and blue skies. The children loved messing about in the small streams tumbling down the hillside. The dry, crisp grass crunched underfoot. No need for walking boots or coat today – in fact it turned out I didn’t need them all week!

We soon arrived at Grimspound and what a fantastic place it is! A real ‘wow’!

We walked around the outside of the circular wall and entered the village through what would have been the original entrance. The two stones forming the doorway certainly give you the feeling that you are entering a place – passing from the outside to the inside.

We looked around several of the houses and each picked our favourite one to live in. I was drawn to the large house in the middle of the village – the one with the ‘porch’. I could see myself living here!

A family were enjoying a picnic next to one of the lower houses (a great place to have one) and several people could be seen walking up to Hookney Tor – something I unfortunately didn’t have time to do on this occasion.

Grimspound is an excellent place to visit - particularly in good weather. It is a lot easier to access than you may think (for a moorland site) and is well worth the effort. I can’t recommend Grimspound highly enough. One of the best places I have visited for a long time.
And it’s another English Heritage site ticked off the list!
Posted by CARL
23rd April 2015ce

Black Hill (Stone Row / Alignment) — Fieldnotes

Visited 17.4.15

Directions:
Adjacent to a minor road across moorland to the north of Haytor Vale. O/S map required.


I saw this site on my O/S map and thought I would check it out. It’s not that often I get the chance to visit a stone row!

Although the road is narrow and parking is difficult we were able to pull over a little way to the south. The barrow is well mangled and is now no more than a low stony mound, easy to miss unless you were specifically looking for it.

30 paces to the north-east of the cairn is the stone row. I was able to identify a total of 10 stones. The tallest stones are the first two you come to. Both are approx 1m tall although one has fallen. There are then 4 smaller stones (approx 0.5m long) all of which are prostrate. There are then another 4 stones (approx 0.5m high) which are still standing. The final two stones are next to each other and clearly form a start/finish point. I suspect the same was originally true of the other end of the row.

This is typical moorland, rough gorse covered. There are good views along the valley to the east.
This site is a little out of the way but well worth the effort of visiting – I am glad I did.

Oddly, E.H. have nothing to report – so my notes will have to do!
Posted by CARL
23rd April 2015ce

Haytor Rock (Rocky Outcrop) — Fieldnotes

Directions:
To the west of Haytor Vale alongside the B3387 – you can’t miss it!


There are a couple of car parks you can choose from, the main one has an information centre and toilets. I bought the E.H. site guides for Merrivale, Hound Tor DMV and Grimspound from the shop.

I don’t know if this site is appropriate to be included on TMA but as other rock outcrops are I assume it is? If not, apologies to the Eds who I am sure will delete anyway!

This is a significant landmark and I am sure it will have been as much a curiosity for the ancients as it is for visitors today.

The walk up to the Tor isn’t that far but it is a little steep. The weather wasn’t so good today and a cold wind and light drizzle took the edge off the visit. There are handy steps carved into the rocks which make climbing to the top a lot easier than it would otherwise have been. There are great all round views to be had but due to the weather the view was limited to ‘only’ several miles.

This is a great place to visit when in the area. I just love these rock Tors – great places to explore!
Posted by CARL
23rd April 2015ce

Seven Lords' (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Visited 17.4.15

Directions:
Approx 1km west of Haytor Rocks – near where a minor road heads south off the B3387


The cairn is visible as a raised circular mound from the road near a dry stone wall.
You can pull over on the grass verge. The cairn has several stones protruding out of the grass around the perimeter of the cairn. The cairn is covered in turf, heather and the dreaded gorse.

Worth stopping off for when on the way to either Haytor Rocks or Hound Tor and its deserted medieval village (also worth a visit)
Posted by CARL
23rd April 2015ce

Duloe Stone Circle — Fieldnotes

Visited 16.4.15

Directions:
In the village of Duloe on the B3254. Sign posted from the road – pedestrian access only from road.
We parked outside the village hall, a short distance to the north.

Karen chose to stay in the car whilst I led the children up the road to the stone circle. We passed a group of young children being taught how to safely ride their bike on the road and make a right hand turn. It was nice to see their teachers doing this and hopefully will reduce the risk of future accidents?

We soon arrive at the circle and the girls made for the lambs, Dafydd for the stones and I for the information board. Oddly enough the information board states there are 8 stones here but I counted 9 (albeit one very small) See Mr Hamhead's notes.

The white of the stones shone brightly against the deep blue of the sky. All was quiet except for the low bleating of the lambs lying in the warm sunshine – wonderful.

Duloe is one of several famous sites I managed to visit during my week in Cornwall and (as with the others) I was not disappointed. This is a superb stone circle to visit with very easy access.
It is remarkable that these sites have managed to survive all these years despite being so close to housing etc.

If you are ever in the area this is a ‘must see’ site.
Posted by CARL
23rd April 2015ce

The Spinsters' Rock (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Fieldnotes

Visited 13.4.15

Directions:
There is a small wooden sign pointing the way from the A382. It is very small and easily missed on this busy road. The minor road leading to the site is narrow with few passing places. However, parking is fine once you arrive at the burial chamber. There is an information board.


This was the first ‘old stone’ of our holiday – and what a cracker it is! It was a lovely spring day with blue sky and white fluffy clouds. Access to the field is via a wooden kissing gate. We said ‘hello’ to the farmer who was busy going about his work. The field was full of sheep and cute lambs. Sophie, Karen and Ella-Rose (we had the grandchild with us for this trip) went to look at the lambs whilst myself and Dafydd explored the dolmen.

I was surprised by the height of the capstone – I was just about able to walk upright underneath it. The uprights had a lot of ‘hairy’ lichen covering them although it was very dry and brittle due to the nice weather. Although re-erected this does not detract from the site at all. I would much rather a dolmen be put back up than left as a pile of stones. After all, wasn’t that the intention of the original builders?

This is an excellent site to visit with easy access (once you find the right road).
Highly recommended and a great way to start the holiday.
Posted by CARL
22nd April 2015ce

Trethevy Quoit (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Fieldnotes

Visited 16.4.15

Directions:
Trevethy Quoit is sign posted when approaching from the north (Darite)


It was another glorious day. Not a cloud in the sky and an unusually hot sun for the time of year. It felt like the middle of summer. We parked in the little parking area and I first read the information board. By now the children had run on in front of me and were already exploring this superb dolmen. I soon went through the wooden kissing gate to join them.

This was one of several famous sites I was looking forward to visiting during my week in Cornwall and it certainly didn’t disappoint. The Dolmen was much larger than I expected and in excellent condition. I really liked the fact that the original entrance is so well preserved and it made you think of the past and the people who would have used it to gain access to the tomb in order to care for their loved ones. I couldn’t help but crouch through the entrance to try to get a feel for what they experienced. Due to the fallen rear stone you can only go in a little way. The main way into the dolmen now is via the fallen stone. I sat on this whilst Dafydd pondered the dolmen’s construction, with the girls happily running around outside blowing bubbles. The only thing detracting from this scene was the close proximity of the houses, which is a pity.

I had wanted to visit this famous site for many years and it felt great to finally get here. It certainly didn’t disappoint. It is worth travelling a long way to see. Fantastic!
Posted by CARL
22nd April 2015ce

Meacombe Burial Chamber — Miscellaneous

Failed visit 13.4.15

Directions:
A short distance south of the A382 / B3206 junction – opposite Meacombe Farm

After visiting the excellent Spinsters’ Rock dolmen I wanted to have a look at this burial chamber.

However, Karen was less than keen as it had been a long drive in a hire car she wasn’t used to driving and the lane leading to the site is very narrow, overgrown and has very few passing places. It didn’t help that the low fuel warning was bleeping away and I knew we were some distance from the likely nearest petrol station. Added to this was the fact the children were getting restless and were keen to get to our caravan.

The hedgerows alongside the road are very high, well over head height and as I said, there are very few places to park. I would say the best place to park would be at the farm to the south and then walk back up the lane to the burial chamber. This was something I didn’t have the opportunity on this occasion to do. Perhaps next time?
Posted by CARL
22nd April 2015ce

Lud Castle (Promontory Fort) — Images

<b>Lud Castle</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
21st April 2015ce

Gaylet Pot (Natural Rock Feature) — Images

<b>Gaylet Pot</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
21st April 2015ce

Boscawen-Un (Stone Circle) — Fieldnotes

A friend and I visited this area number of years ago. It was a cold muddy January day in 2005. We did take a few photos but they're not digital. We had visited several other sites that day including the Merry Maidens, the well at Madron and Men-an-Tol, but this really was the highlight.
We had driven down from Glastonbury the night before. I was still healing from a broken ankle the previous summer so the walking was a bit treacherous, with all the holes in the surrounding fields hidden by small clumps of growth. After a bit of effort, we were able to find this stone circle and also walking by what appeared to be a miniature version of it! Nice to hear it is more accessible now, but the mystery of it and its hidden quality was part of its appeal. It reminded me of an ancient sundial, with its large center stone resting at an angle.
In 2002 I wrote a poem about this place, before having visited it, that won the Morris Cup in the Gorseth Kernow. I was asked to read it on the radio via BBC Cornwall--the announcer said I had captured the place very well, considering…I do hope to go back again…
albion Posted by albion
21st April 2015ce

Damil (Hillfort) — Fieldnotes

Damil is still pronounced locally as Danehill from which the hills present name is derived. Ramparts once existed here and several finds from the hill are now in Aberdeen University. Local historians also say that the fort was also used by Italian led visitors. Now the fort is a crop field and a wood of recently planted trees. Stunning views all round including an unusual but wonderful view of Bennachie.

The hill is a short (and not very steep) climb north of the Mains of Asloun farm. Head south on the A980 from Alford taking the third minor road west. The farm is the first minor road north. For those interested in ruined castles Asloun castle is at the end of the minor road. A very beautiful and mysterious place.

Visited 11/5/2015.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
21st April 2015ce

Castle Dykes (Promontory Fort) — Fieldnotes

From Middle Knox Farm I headed straight north on the farm track leading up and thru Upper Knox. A pleasant day for a walk as on this day the temp was 22. On reaching the minor road head west then take the next minor road north. This leads thru Peattie farm. Keep going north easterly until the track ends. Head down the slopes, wade across the Bervie Water (suitable attire was worn) and the promontory will be in front.

Sadly nothing remains of this fort except indicators of ramparts on cropmarks and aerial photography. However it is an ideal place for this type of fort with the nearby Bervie Water providing fresh water. The steep slopes on 3 sides provide natural protection. Nearby are Millpough (RSC) and Pitcharles (cairn) as well as Allardice Castle.

However by this time the temp had dropped to 8 so it was time to head back to Middle Knox via the Bervie Water. Not quite so relished this time.

Visited 5/4/2015.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
21st April 2015ce

Little Hendra (Round Barrow(s)) — Fieldnotes

Directions:
A short distance west of the Pelynt barrows.

The road running immediately to the north is narrow with few passing places. However, there is just about room to pull over next to the wooden field gate which gives access to the field where the barrow is. My O/S map showed two barrows, divided by a public footpath. There is no sign post for a footpath so I assume access is via the field gate?

I could only spot one barrow, which is easy to identify as a large low grass covered ‘bump’ in the field.
Not worth going out of your way for although more to see than the Pelynt barrows!

E.H. state:
‘Three bowl barrows situated close to the summit of a ridge between two tributaries of an unnamed river leading to Polperro. The barrows survive as two circular mounds and one oval mound. The northern mound measures 40m and up to 1.7m high. The southern mound is 38m in diameter and 1.5m high. The eastern mound is oval and measures 40m long by 30m wide and up to 1m high – it is cut on the east side by a farm lane’.
Posted by CARL
21st April 2015ce

Pelynt Round Barrow Cemetery (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Fieldnotes

Visited 15.4.15

Directions: See mr Hamhead's notes.

As recommended I parked at the Spar car park (few other places to park) and whilst the children sat and enjoyed their ice creams I headed off down the rough lane towards the barrows. Please note that the track which runs to the east of the barrows is not suitable for driving.

The field where the barrows are marked on the map had been recently ploughed and to be honest I couldn’t make any barrows out. Perhaps this was due to the strong sunlight or perhaps they have now been completely ploughed out?

The walk along the track was pleasant but not one to recommend.
Posted by CARL
21st April 2015ce

Long Tom (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

Visited 16.1.15

Directions:
About 1km south-west of Minions (No sign of Gru!)

Long Tom is easy to spot from the road and parking is also easy – on the grass verge.

Long Tom is a tall, slender stone which has a good covering of ‘hairy moss’ – dried out on my visit due to the wonderful warm weather. The cross carved on its southern face is easier to make out than the cross on the northern side. The stone is situated in a fine moorland setting with good all round views.

Long Tom is well worth stopping off for when en route between visiting Trethevy Quoit and the nearby Hurlers stone circles.
Posted by CARL
21st April 2015ce

Wateresk Dolmen (Portal Tomb) — Images

<b>Wateresk Dolmen</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Wateresk Dolmen</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Wateresk Dolmen</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
21st April 2015ce
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