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Carn Briw (Round Cairn) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Carn Briw</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carn Briw</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
19th November 2014ce

Glenquicken Cist — Folklore

Understandably, Canmore won't pin the first of these stories to this particular cist. But it might well be the culprit? The second, 'Cairnywanie', with its similarly noble skeleton, was at NX512584, but has all but disappeared.
About the year 1809, Mr McLean of Mark, while improving a field in the moor of Glenquicken, in Kirkmabreck parish, found it necessary to remove a very large cairn, which is said by tradition to have been the tomb of a king of Scotland, which is not in the genuine series, Aldus McGaldus, McGillus or McGill. When the cairn had been removed, the workmen came to a stone coffin of very rude workmanship; and on removing the lid, they found the skeleton of a man, of uncommon size; the bones were in such a state of decomposition that the ribs and vertebrae crumbled into dust, on attempting to lift them. The remaining bones being more compact, were taken out; when it was discovered that one of the arms had been almost separated from the shoulder by the stroke of a stone axe, and that a fragment of the axe still remained in the bone. The axe had been of green stone, a species of stone never found in this part of Scotland. There was also found with this skeleton a ball of flint, about three inches diameter, which was perfectly round, and highly polished, and the head of an arrow, that was also of flint; but not a particle of any metallic substance was found.
Mr Denniston of Creetown's Letter to Mr. Train, of Newton Stewart, dated the 22d of October, 1819.

About the year 1778, in removing a quantity of stones for building dikes from a large tumulus in Glenquicken Moor, there was found a stone coffin, containing a human skeleton, which was greatly above the ordinary size. There was also found in this sepulchral monument an urn containing ashes, and an earthen pitcher. The urn seems to evince the antiquity of this tumulus, when the British practised funeral cremation. This tumulus is called Cairnywanie. Thus we have an account of two skeletons of very large size, found in Glenquicken Moor at different times. These facts seem to confirm the tradition that a battle had taken place here at some very remote period.
From the Statistical Account iv, p332 (browse under 'Kirkmabreck').
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
19th November 2014ce

Carn Briw (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Carn Briw</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carn Briw</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carn Briw</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
19th November 2014ce

Hafodty (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Hafodty</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
19th November 2014ce

Carn Briw (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Carn Briw</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
19th November 2014ce

Hafodty (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Hafodty</b>Posted by postman<b>Hafodty</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
19th November 2014ce

Carn Briw (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Carn Briw</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
19th November 2014ce

Hafodty (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Hafodty</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
19th November 2014ce

Carn Briw (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Carn Briw</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
19th November 2014ce

Hafodty (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Hafodty</b>Posted by postman<b>Hafodty</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
19th November 2014ce

Carn Ingli Camp (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Carn Ingli Camp</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carn Ingli Camp</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carn Ingli Camp</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carn Ingli Camp</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carn Ingli Camp</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
18th November 2014ce

Capel Garmon (Chambered Cairn) — Fieldnotes

Dawn arrives at Fferm y'Rynys - a little under a mile below and to the south of the great chambered long barrow standing mute testimony to millennia of humankind's ultimately forlorn attempts to tame this wild, uncompromising landscape - to witness my tent.. somehow.. still clinging to this North Walian hillside, like a particularly stubborn limpet upon the foreshore beneath Penmaenmawr, having defied the unwelcome attentions of Hurricane Gonzalo's swirling extremities during the night. Well, at least the meteorologists named this latest manifestation of Nature's destructive power after a male, albeit (presumably) one from Shakespeare's 'Tempest'. How poetic. Anyway, having just about managed to avoid dashing out what brains I do possess upon Tal-y-Fan's summit crags the previous day, I wisely resist the siren call of the high peaks, as exemplified by the soaring profile of Moel Siabod to the west. Must be getting old. So Capel Garmon it is.

Ironically, despite having patronised Gareth and Carol Williams wondrous campsite more-or-less every year since 1989, this is but my third visit to the superb neolithic monument which overlooks the fertile Conwy Valley at its juncture with that of the Machno. As noted by previous members parking/access is not ideal if approaching from the village of Capel Garmon. Hence I decide to finally take Carol's advice and walk from my tent. Hey, why hadn't I thought of that before? Standing at the campsite entrance the access road continues uphill beyond a gate, the negotiation of a couple more such barriers bringing me to a public footpath veering left where a large corrugated iron barn looms above. From here marker posts direct the would-be visitor across a couple of fields until the great funerary monument is seen slumbering below, beyond a kissing date. Yeah, this is a much better way to arrive, blown in on the wind.

Immediately it is obvious that Gonzalo hasn't finished yet, not by a long chalk. Violent gusts of wind propel towering cathedrals of cumulonimbus across the sky, unleashing shafts of golden sunlight interacting with lashing rain squalls to send rainbows arcing into the apparent stratosphere, tripping the light fantastic to the symphony in my head. The scene, the vibe is so 'Turner-esque' that, upon glancing toward the natural gorsedd to the north, I almost expect to see Timothy Spall sitting there, paintbrush in hand. Nature's invigoratingly full-on theatrics would be more than enough today, to be fair. However Capel Garmon happens to be an absolutely first rate monument....

Substantial, too, a central 'chamber', flanked by another large example either side upon an approx east-west axis entered - at least originally - by a narrow passage to the south, this seemingly aligned upon the aforementioned gorsedd (as noted by Mr Cope in his day-glo tome). Seems a reasonable assumption to me. However for me the most impressive component of this great chambered long barrow is the massive capstone which still rests, albeit with a bit of help from a surprisingly unobtrusive concrete support, upon the western chamber. This is open to the west giving the impression of being the entrance. But apparently, in true Cotswold-Severn tradition, this was actually a falsie. More to the point though is why we have a Cotswold-Severn influenced monument up here upon a raging Snowdonian hillside at all? How very odd.

Pondering such imponderables I sit inside and let a couple of hours drift by in relative shelter. 'Relative' since even the overwhelming mass of a 14ft capstone isn't sufficient to keep out the weather in these parts today. Particularly tail ends of hurricanes. In some ways Capel Garmon's great tomb sticks out like a sore thumb here in the uplands of Northern Snowdonia, the preserve of the great Bronze Age round cairn. But I, for one, am not complaining.
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
18th November 2014ce
Edited 19th November 2014ce

Carn Ingli Camp (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Carn Ingli Camp</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carn Ingli Camp</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carn Ingli Camp</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carn Ingli Camp</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carn Ingli Camp</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carn Ingli Camp</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carn Ingli Camp</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
18th November 2014ce

Castell Treruffydd (Enclosure) — Folklore

Well TSC, there is some I have found for you :)
Mr John Griffith wrote as follows:
"It is well known at Moylgrove that for ages the cauldron has been the show-place of the parish. Visitors are even now attracted to the place; but, in times past, I have learnt from the natives that, besides the cauldron itself, there were at least two still more powerful attractions on the spot - a well and a witch. Then, be it remembered, that right opposite the creek is a 'castle,' which Fenton compares with Tintagel. The only cottage on the headland where the 'castle' is situate is called Pen y Castell. Athwart the slope of Pen y Castell is a finely-constructed bridle-path, which leads to the castle. It is from near this bridle-path that the best view of the cauldron can be obtained.

"... The Rev. Llewelyn Griffiths, Dinas [...] knew the cauldron well. When I mentioned Ffynnon Halen, he corrected me and said its name is Fynnon Alem. When he was a lad at Moylgrove, he learned of it, as a thing which had happened just then - that somebody saw a mermaid at Pwll y Wrach, with long hair, waving an arm out of the water.

"... The Rev. J.T. Evans and I made another 'find'. We found a regularly-constructed path leading into one side of the cauldron. It is narrow, yet wide enough for a person to walk with both feet down together, if you can fancy a man walking so. Nervous people had better avoid it though. The path leads into a cave of considerable size and length. Somebody once must have made much use of the cave. The making of a path on the sheer side of the cauldron was ticklish work.

"Now, Mr Davies [the village blacksmith] told me that the people there still talk of a witch inhabiting the cave, and of people who used to visit Pwll y Wrach to consult the Wrach. I judged, from what i heard, that such a witch might have been haunting the place, say, within the last century. At any rate, Mr Davies and his neighbours do not draw on our [ie Welsh] mythology for an explanation of Pwll y Wrach. They regard the name as associated with a common witch."
This is from an article in Archaeologia Cambrensis from 1860, in which A.W. Wade-Evans is determined to connect mythological places with real places in Wales. He's a man after my own heart of course. Although one has to know when to give up, and maybe in this case he stretches a bit far. Mythological places don't have to exactly coincide with real places, isn't that their charm? He wants to suggest that a stolen cauldron (a proper iron article) mentioned in the Llyfr Coch o Hergest "is", in a mythological sort of way, represented by the Pwll y Wrach, as the book says "there is the measure of the cauldron". Or something. It's a bit tenuous.

I think his only connection to the word cauldron is his rather anecdotal I very distinctly remember a lady living close by, and who had lived there from childhood, telling me she had always known [Pwll y Wrach] in English as "The Witch's Cauldron." The inhabitants say it is a marvel to see in stormy weather, for in such a time it seethes like a boiling pot.

But regardless of the likelihood of his arguments, this sounds like a pretty marvellous natural place, connected with witches and holy wells and mermaids and castles from the mists of time, and what more do you want really.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
17th November 2014ce

Cot Llwyd (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Images

<b>Cot Llwyd</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Cot Llwyd</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Cot Llwyd</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Cot Llwyd</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
16th November 2014ce

Carn Llwyd (Carningli) standing stone (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Carn Llwyd (Carningli) standing stone</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carn Llwyd (Carningli) standing stone</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
16th November 2014ce

Castell Treruffydd (Enclosure) — Images

<b>Castell Treruffydd</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Castell Treruffydd</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Castell Treruffydd</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Castell Treruffydd</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Castell Treruffydd</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Castell Treruffydd</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
16th November 2014ce

Castell Treruffydd (Enclosure) — Miscellaneous

Immediately east of the fort is a collapsed sea cave called Pwll y Wrach (known in English as "The Witch's Cauldron").

It's a great place to see seals, although I've not been able to find any folklore associated with the name.

Coflein has some aerial shots of both the fort and the Cauldron.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
16th November 2014ce

Castell Treruffydd (Enclosure) — Images

<b>Castell Treruffydd</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
16th November 2014ce

Mynydd Carningli (Sacred Hill) — Images

<b>Mynydd Carningli</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
16th November 2014ce

Carn Ffoi (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Carn Ffoi</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
16th November 2014ce

North Uist, Benbecula and South Uist — News

3,500-year-old basket excavated at North Uist beach


From the BBC...

"An artefact thought to be 3,500 years old that was uncovered by the tide on a Western Isles beach has been excavated before being washed away.

The prehistoric basket was discovered in an area of shoreline where the sea has been eroding the land at Baleshare in North Uist.

Archaeologists have managed to remove the object with help from the local community.

It will be examined by AOC Archaeology Group.

The basket appears to contain animal bones covered in a layer of quartz pebbles."

More here...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-30055116
1speed Posted by 1speed
14th November 2014ce

Carreg Coetan Arthur (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Images

<b>Carreg Coetan Arthur</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carreg Coetan Arthur</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carreg Coetan Arthur</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Carreg Coetan Arthur</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
13th November 2014ce
Previous 50 | Showing 101-150 of 108,653 posts. Most recent first | Next 50