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Tealing Hill 2 (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork)

Head in a north west direction from the Tealing Stones across the fields until the fence. (1k approx.) Over the gate and follow the track until slightly beyond the trees, you should see the fence heading directly west.

Tiompan found these roundhouses several years ago and has hasn't filed a report. There are 2 roundhouses, 1 fairly massive and other slightly smaller (far to big to be hut circles) with tremendous views south.

Worth a mention as it ties in with the next small site.

Visited 3/1/2015.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
6th January 2015ce

Tealing Stones (Standing Stones)

From the ring and cup marked rock we followed the fence east until it made a T junction with another fence. The track behind probably comes up from the cottages where the car is parked. Obviously we took the scenic route :-)

No changes here, it is still overgrown and with the height of the vegetation hard to spot so keep an eye out for the tree standing by itself.

Visited 3/1/2015.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
6th January 2015ce

Tealing Hill (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art)

Head east from Huntingfaulds Cairn. Luckily I have the stone's finder so no problems here. 13 cups with 4 ringed. Found by Tiompan during 2004.

Visited 3/1/2015.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
6th January 2015ce

Huntingfaulds (Cairn(s))

After a 'fair nicht oot' a good walk was required so Tealing Hill and the Sidlaws provided the answer. Once again Tiompan was my guide which took in an area of varied prehistory.

Turn west towards Tealing from the A90 (heading north), go past the famous souterrain and take the first minor road heading north. A row of cottages provides plenty car parking.

Walk up the hill thru Huntingfaulds Farm and just east of the track the cairn can seen. Unbelievably the farmer has erected a protective fence around the site complete with a gate. Sadly the cairn is much damaged, one or two kerbs might remain and there are hints of a cist. The remnants are 9 meters wide and 0.5m tall. Situated nicely on top of a hillock there are lovely all round views.

Visited 3/1/2015.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
6th January 2015ce

West Mains (Cairn(s))

The final climb of another superb day in the Angus Hills, the afternoon being spent again in the great company of Tiompan whose knowledge of the area is unsurpassed. West Mains was our final destination.

At Auchterhouse on the B954 take the minor road west which turns into a minor road, go past East Mains and follow sign to West Mains. We stopped at the first gap in the hedge and parked.

Head up the hill thru the fields until the rough pasture. A track leads to the top of the hill. Once again lovely scenery as the shades of night came down. Sadly two sheepdogs were interested in us trying to 'nip' our legs, their owner barely tried to stop them as they harried our progress. Why people like this are allowed dogs beggars belief.

The cairn is at the top of the hill and has fantastic all round views, even as the sun was fading. Even better the moon came out to play. The cairn is approximately 22 meters wide and 1.5 meters high and according to Canmore remains 'intact'. A double cist was excavated during the late 1800s and the spoil from this somewhat ironically used to build the more modern cairn. Also on top of the cairn is a trig point.

The end of a magnificent day with great company. A night of music and refreshment in Fife to come and some sleep. The next day we will do more exploring.

Visited 2/1/2015.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
6th January 2015ce

Fiscary (Chambered Cairn)

The Forest of Borgie is not perhaps the best place in Scotland for an exhausted antiquarian to spend the night, its dark, 'moist' interior seemingly offering the optimum breeding environment for that most annoying of Highland creatures.... the fisherman. Why they can't keep themselves to themselves I simply do not know. Having said that the trees also provide pretty ideal conditions for midges, too, although the driving rain which greets me at dawn at least mitigates against their adverse impact somewhat. Scanning the map I decide to head toward Bettyhill upon the A836 to check out some cairns I've circled - well, highlighted with a rather poor scrawl of indecorous form - on the map a little east of the village. Might be of interest..... er, perhaps.

Now visitors new to the area might well wish to make a diversion to see some of the excellent monuments of Strath Naver (e.g Skelpick and Coille na Borgie). I, however, park a short distance beyond the Farr road (the Swordly turning is too far) and walk up the obvious track to the North east. Although the weather conditions are absolutely shocking my initial displeasure is short lived, soon rendered more-or-less irrelevant by the realisation that here, at Fiscary, we have another of the northern coast's prehistoric gems just sitting upon the hill side above the road as naturally as you like. As if it has always done so.... which, from our modern perspective, is not that far from the truth, when you think about it?

The first of the trio of cairns I have the distinct pleasure of encountering [NC73226248] is a massive example of the round genre, according to RCAHMS "27m in diameter and 3.5m high, which has been disturbed but does not appear to have been excavated". An unusual feature - in my experience possibly unique - is the presence of a retaining, circular wall of rubble defining the base of the cairn in lieu of a kerb, this, by all accounts, an original feature. A large flat stone "1.6m by 0.7m" lying upon the monument's south-western nether regions is perhaps suggestive of a chamber subsumed within. It certainly doesn't appear to be field clearance, so I reckon this is a pretty good bet. All in all a very impressive monument, then. But wait, there's more....

Looming above through swirling mist to the approx NNW stand another two large cairns. Again, however, there is an unexpected twist to proceedings... the full-on Chubby Checker experience with The Fat Boys thrown in for good measure, in fact. Something I simply wouldn't have expected. I mean, I'd never heard of this little, craggy coastal hill top before, so it just goes to show what is literally lying around the Scottish landscape. Yeah, as I reach the summit it is soon apparent that the pair of cairns are connected by a 'platform of stones', the uniform, consolidated nature of which prompted Audrey Henshall (1972) to surmise that here we might well have a 'waisted long cairn of two distinct periods'... as at the infinitely more famous Camster. Blimey! The first cairn [NC73116260] is another massive round stone pile, once again apparently intact and '20.0m in diameter and 2.7m high.' A little way beyond [at NC73106263] - and linked by that umbilical platform - is an Orkney-Cromarty chambered cairn with a 'Camster type tripartite chamber.. 16.0m in diameter and 1.5m high' (Henshall 1963), this still defined by the remains of a number of internal orthostats. Double blimey! Hey, perhaps if it hadn't been excavated by Kerr in 1891 it would also be more-or-less intact. Perhaps.

The hilltop possesses a fine view across Farr Bay and the coast, in better weather (not that difficult a concept to grasp today, to be fair) no doubt proving to be an idyllic spot for a picnic. As it is I receive a full-on, merciless pounding from the inclement conditions, low cloud advancing menacingly across the mountains rising to landward and bringing yet further driving rain. But, regardless, how great is it that such an intriguingly unusual prehistoric complex can survive in such a substantial state of preservation upon the tourist trail? A rhetorical question for a Citizen Cairn'd, naturally.
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
6th January 2015ce

Carlunie (Cairn(s))

Once back down the hill at Arniefoul we headed back to the A928 and south to the Mains Of Ogilvie. Here we turned west and kept going until Upper Middleton farm. With permission granted to park the 'great unwashed' we proceeded to climb the hill. Carlunie Hill is quite a steep climb but on the whole not to difficult. As well as quarries to fall into beware of lots of wee holes.

This is a beautiful place made all the more spectacular thanks to a covering of snow. I love the snow as it brings a different atmosphere and obviously improves the scenery on a nice sunny day. On Arniefoul it snowed quite a lot, but here it was clear. The view north to Denoon Hillfort is stunning, as is the view everywhere from the summit.

The cairn itself is 14 meters wide and 2 meters high. It has been houked a bit on the south side but today it looked perfect despite the fences meeting place on top of it. Great place!!!

Visited 2/1/2015.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
5th January 2015ce

Arniefoul (Cairn(s))

Head north west on the A928 from the A90 (north of Tealing) and take the first minor road east, then next minor road south. Today road conditions were quite tricky thanks to heavy snow but taking our time we arrived at our destination near The Wreaths farm at the first house.

From here its on foot and head east basically thru the fields, over fences, heather and flurries of snow. There is another trap awaiting the unwary. Quarries aplenty up here so lots of quarried stones to look at. In fact these places are worth a good look. Most of the dry stane dykes in the area appear to come from here going by the stone shapes and sizes.

Once at the top, in amongst these quarries, look for a small clump of trees. The cairn is underneath these trees and continues to the south. Some kerbs remain on the south side. The cairn itself is 21 meters wide and 1.8 meters tall.

Visited 2/1/2015.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
5th January 2015ce

Knowehead (Cairn(s))

This might look like a massive cairn but it isn't. It is a natural mound some 30 meters wide by 4 meters high. The cairn is the top bit some 12 meters wide and 1 meter high. It is situated in a beautiful place with beautiful views, the River Isla to the south and the Highlands to the north. Going by the field there is a fair chance the mound was an island as the Isla seemed to be returning to normal after recent flooding in the area. Certainly the walk to the mound created a lot of misery for the old boots. Formerly it was used, as normal, as a place of justice.

However the sun came out and it became a very calm and warm place. Within another hour things would somewhat change.

Leave Coupar Angus heading in a northern direction on the A923. Cross the River Isla and stop at the first crossroads then look east.

Visited 2/1/2015.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
5th January 2015ce

High Keillor Farm (Standing Stone / Menhir)

Also known as Baldowrie Farm the stone is what everybody else says so I'll mention the cairn instead.

The cairn is kept intact by a wall covering the east/north/west curve. Superb views north, today the highlands are white but the snow is coming my way later on. Sitting at 13 meters wide and 0.7 meters tall the cairn has had several cists removed. Prehistoric discoveries have also been made in nearby fields.

So a nice place in a nice setting!

Visited 2/1/2015.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
4th January 2015ce

Kinpurnie (Cairn(s))

I headed along, west, from the artificial mound at Newbigging and turned west at the crossroads. About 300 meters or so along the road I pulled and promptly waddled into the biggest mud bath I've been in for a while. The cairn is only 200-300 meters from the road but today with all the rain and melted snow it's a bit of a nightmare.

The cairn is 27 meters wide and 2.5 meters high. It most likely has the remnants of cist in the middle. Certainly the correct shaped stones are still there, but you do well to notice them given the vegetation. Views north are superb, but at this time the continuing snow on the hills blocked the view. Happily the weather was about to improve for a wee while.

Visited 2/1/2015.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
4th January 2015ce

Newbigging Farm (Artificial Mound)

From Belliduff I headed south on the B954 and then took the first minor road heading west. Take the first minor road south west. Near the end of the long straight the mound can be seen in the field to the north. I parked at Auchtertyre farm and walked back down the road. With all the rain the field had become a mudbath so I squelched merrily along to the mound with sound affects.

The mound is 10 meters and 1.5 meters tall. Trees have been planted on top. The wall that is meant to surround the site seems to have vanished. Wonderful views north do exist but they were obscured by heavy snow.

Visited 2/1/2015.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
4th January 2015ce

Belliduff (Cairn(s))

Leave Meigle heading south on the B954. There is a wall on the west side of the road just after the houses come to an end. Stop at the first gap in the wall. The cairn is a very short walk from the main road on the other side.

Yet another bit of the Macbeth saga is found. (how many times did this guy die ? :-) )

The cairn stands at 15 meters wide and is 1.5 meters. Cists have been opened here and their stones might be here but there is also a lot of field clearance. It is heavily overgrown with a walkers worst enemy, bramble bushes. Still its a nice site with the various vegetation giving some wonderful colour.

Visited 2/1/2015.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
4th January 2015ce

Carsegownie (Round Cairn)

I approached from the north after leaving Melgund and headed south pulling in at Carsegownie. Luckily enough the farmer appeared at the same time so permission to see the cairn was granted. I wonder if he did read Gladman's note :-) Nothing much more to report except that there seems to be more field clearance dumped.

Visited 2/1/2014.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
3rd January 2015ce

Melgund Cottage (Cairn(s))

Head south west from Brechin on the B9134. If looking for nearby Court Law don't bother it has gone. Keep going this direction thru Netherton and take the first farm track to Melgund. I parked at the junction to Melgund Cottage.

The cairn is in the field immediately south. I walked first to the cottage and was given permission to view the site. In an area with lots of big cairns this is no exception, it sits at 30 meters wide and is 2 meters high. There doesn't appear to be a kerb. Quite a lot of field clearance has been dumped here as well. Still the trees add to atmosphere as does the fort at Bogardo to the south west.

Visited 2/1/2015.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
3rd January 2015ce

Kintrockat (Cairn(s))

First stop and daylight pokes its head out near Brechin at Kintrockat Cairn. During the drive down there had been heavy snow and very heavy rain but when I park at the woodcutters hut the sun comes out. The snow I'd see later.

Leaving A90 take the A935 to Brechin, go round the roundabout until you are heading back to the A90 south. Just before reaching the A90 take the minor road heading south. This takes you past a lodge, I parked at the woodcutters place 200 meters approx south. From here I continued walking south and followed the road to Kintrockat House. Just before the house there is a track, or mudbath. Follow this round and the cairn will come into view. Unfortunately the woodcutter has been busy and branches are all over the place some on the cairn itself.

This well shaped cairn is almost 9 meters wide and 4 meters tall. It is made up of earth and stones. Local folklore mentions that markets were held nearby. So a lovely start to the day.

Visited 2/1/2015.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
3rd January 2015ce

Cnoc An Daimh (Chambered Cairn)

Driving along the coastal A894 from the lovely (cairnless) chambered cairn at Badnabay I happen to glance up to my left upon passing the shore of Loch an Daimh Beg, a little south (ish) of Scourie.... to see what appears to be a large cairn surmounting the near crag. Pulling into a handy lay-by beside a gate in the deer fence, a quick fumble for the map confirms what, in these parts anyway, has come to be generally accepted wisdom, at least where I'm concerned; namely it's a pretty fair bet that a large pile of stones will turn out to represent a chambered cairn. To my shame, exhausted by the day's exertions and with time advancing inexorably toward night, I momentarily consider passing on by, like a motorised Dionne Warwick... or The Stranglers, if you prefer. Happily, in retrospect, I pull myself together in the nick of time. Good man.

The gate accesses a stony track heading initially for Bealach na h-Imrich. And then goodness knows where? Gaelic names upon the map. The monument is soon forthcoming, crowning a small crag above to my right and appears pretty substantial, albeit now very much part of the landscape it was no doubt once erected to stand apart from as a statement of intent. Perhaps. As usual Audrey Henshall had the details back in 1963, the cairn of Orkney-Cromarty type with a diameter of c40ft and a small (apparently) polygonal chamber, entered from the north/north-east, defined by four orthostats subsumed within the summit, their tops nevertheless still visible. So, quite a substantial monument with internal detail still in situ.

But there's much more to this site in the form of some quite magnificent views, particularly looking south across Loch a'Chreagain Theth to the enigmatic profile of Quinag upon the skyline and... I think.... even the legendary Suilven. While to the south-west the eye is guided by the contrasting, yet aesthetically complementary contours of land and water across Badcall Bay to a myriad islands and islets occupying the inner reaches of Eddrachillis Bay. Looking north-west the map depicts a hut circle upon the far shore of Loch an Daimh Beg, several other examples apparently set below the cairn to the approx south-west. East? I'm reminded of the hauntingly barren waterscapes of North Uist. Quite an accolade, to be fair. Oh for more time.

As it is a truncated visit must suffice. I watch as several cars arrive at the hotel in Lower Badcall... whilst I will sleep tonight in the company of young stags above Loch Lurgainn. Guess one day the hotel will appear attractive. Not just yet, however.
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
3rd January 2015ce
Edited 4th January 2015ce

Badnabay (Chambered Cairn)

This, the barest bones of an Orkney-Cromarty chambered cairn - yeah, very much minus the cairn nowadays - is about as far removed from the great Balnacrae seen earlier this trip as perhaps my imagination will allow. And, to be fair, I can imagine quite a lot. Sitting unobtrusively near the coastal A894 a little west of Laxford Bridge, the monument is nevertheless beguiling.... small, yet perfectly formed might well be an apt description.

According to Audrey Henshall (1963), as you might expect up here on this wild 'n windy coastline, fifteen orthostats (apparently of wondrous gneiss) remain in situ, the tallest a modest 3ft 8ins in height. These form a two sectioned chamber (the outer rectangular, the more substantial inner, oval) originally accessed by a portalled passage some 7ft in length to the south-east.

Now although the chambered cairn occupies a low-lying position upon grassland beside the Traigh Bad na Baighe, the outlook presented to a weary, yet well satisfied traveller chilling out within is certainly expansive, the plaudits (in my opinion) going to the view looking eastward toward the distant summit of Sàil Mhór, with Foináven to its left... also north-east across Traigh Bad na Baighe and Laxford Bay, colours muted by the overcast light subject to occasional irradiance as the evening sun refuses to submit to bland uniformity. Although, having said that, the elegant profile of Ben Stack looming above the little hamlet of Badnabay to the south-east is pretty fine, too. Such is the nature of the topography here that aspects toward the other points of the compass are more localised, craggy hill sides the order of the day.

As I sit and drink my coffee a muciferous slug, riding a trail of seemingly unparalleled viscosity, makes its laboured, slimy way toward the top of the tallest chamber stone. 'Al', as I duly christen it - being ignorant of how to determine the sex of gasteropod land molluscs, but pretty adept at the morals (or rather lack of them) of politicians - doesn't quite make it. A portent of the future, perhaps? Whatever the ultimate outcome of human conflict instigated by the egos of such people - whether cyclical fluctuations of the political status quo, or death and destruction by armed conflict, for me locations such as Badnabay place things into some sort of context. We may come and go, but when all is said and done Nature will carry on sorting the good ideas from the bad according to her selective algorithm. Hmm. Writer Neil Gunn (his memorial encountered at Heights of Brae) would no doubt have been able to elaborate upon this theme better than I.

Time flies and I must move on in order to achieve an Inverpolly wild camp before dark. Needless to say such are the archaeological riches of this magical coastline that that proves a very tall order. Cnoc An Daimh sees to that.

N.B: my thanks to TMA contributor 'tumulus' - Martin McCarthy - for highlighting the existence of this excellent site through:
http://www.ancient-scotland.co.uk
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
3rd January 2015ce
Edited 6th January 2015ce

Balnacrae (Chambered Cairn)

Megalithically-minded travellers immersing themselves in the landscape and lore of auld Alba .... perhaps searching for that special 'something' a little out of the ordinary, somewhere off the beaten track... might well consider perusing Greywether's collected field notes as an appropriate introductory well of inspiration. And why not, when monuments of the calibre of the great Balnacrae chambered cairn are included within that canon? I've wanted to come here for several years now; had the map co-ordinates ready and everything. Nevertheless, I guess the extended approach - allied to the possibility of an unclimbable deer fence making all the effort superfluous at, quite literally, the final hurdle - put me off. However, having spent a memorable morning at the Heights of Brae chambered cairn, wondrously sited looking across to the Knock Farril, an expedition - for it is such - to Balnacrae suddenly acquired that rather overused classification of 'must visit'.

A minor road heads west from Evanton approximately tracing the line of the River Sgitheach - to the fast flowing watercourse's north - passing the hamlet of Swordale before running out of tarmac just south of Milton Lodge, beneath the wooded heights of Swordale Hill. I wouldn't say there's plenty of room to park since, according to the occupant of the house when I duly knocked upon his door, the council own the road's terminus, as evidenced by a stationary dumper truck. Please bear this in mind if you come. Anyway, I head off along the private, rough track toward Fannyfield (great name... assuming you've a sense of humour and actually understand what feminism is about, of course), veering right at the buildings to ascend to a forestry track heading into the trees... as such tracks tend to do. Ignoring an initial left hand fork apparently accessing the river, I make swift progress, trending to the left and ignoring all right hand turns until a final section, resembling something from The Somme circa 1916, ensures every additional step extracts the maximum effort, a full-on obstacle course of fallen trees and head high gulleys. Eventually I reach the aforementioned deer fence, the exhausted traveller separated from the boundary line by yet another deep gulley... needless to say the most cavernous yet! The track veers to the northwest toward the ruined farmstead of Balnacrae... however I chance my arm and find it is currently (May 2014) possible to cross the fence at this point to emerge upon the open hill side above Strath Sgitheach. Furthermore a row of stones crowns the rise to my right like a phalanx of warriors drawn up in battle array.... or a group of Easter Island moai pondering whether to 'turn left', as instructed by that dodgy satnav from that equally dodgy shop in Inverness. That'll be the monument, then. And it sure is a big one. The warm glow of success lingers momentarily before it's down to business once more.

As I approach (slightly) uphill my initial impression is that my homework must've been subject to a few too many sherberts since the monument appears to possess a very 'linear' profile, some variant of seriously trashed long cairn, perhaps? However a grassy, circular footprint of significant diameter subsequently says otherwise. As does the wondrous Audrey Henshall, who reckoned in 1963 that this is an 'Orkney-Cromarty type cairn'... with 'an edge, which suggests a diameter of at least 75[feet]', this revised by the OS a couple of years later to c93ft. Morever the stones are very hefty indeed for a chambered cairn, ranging from 2'4" to 6' 6" (dimensions again courtesy of ASH). And there are a lot of them, too, as if to compensate for the almost total loss of the cairn itself. So, why so many chambers stones? As with Greywether before me, the act of mentally reconstructing the now free-standing interior of this chambered cairn is easier said than done... beyond me, to be honest. Two chambers or one? Hmm. ASH reckoned the passage entered to the north-east; however aside from that, the great Balnacrae tomb is an enigma. Come here and see what you think?

I sit in the shade of one of the substantial stones - they offer quite a bit, to be fair - and try to reconcile how the brooding remains of this chambered cairn now slumber in complete and utter obscurity.... when the tomb must once have been the focal point of local life. The Maes Howe of the area, no less. However times have changed, have they not? For good and bad, I guess. No Ladytron back then, for a start. The location is not overly dramatic, but subtle and telling, the cairn occupying the apex of a (very loose) triangle incorporating the heights of Meall a'Ghuail and Cnoc a'Bhreacaich and focussed upon the River Sgitheach, arguably mirroring that of Heights of Brae mentioned earlier. Or most probably vice versa. The realisation that these people knew their landscape inside out is impossible to ignore. Hey, I couldn't even tell you who lives a few doors up from me. As I said, times have changed.

I stay to enjoy the complete and utter peace here until I can linger no more, well aware that I've a bastard of a return in store and attempting it in darkness would not be good. So... if chambered cairns are really your bag be advised that Balnacrae would fall foul of the Trade Descriptions Act. There is but the trace of a cairn here. However if ancient stones help take your thoughts to somewhere you would like them to be... Balnacrae has more than enough.

Oh. Thanks to Greywether for the inspiration to come to this wondrous place. I would love more to come.
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
2nd January 2015ce
Edited 3rd January 2015ce

Millfield (Burnt Mound / Fulacht Fia)

Coming along the Seatter road and turning for Noltland, opposite the junction with the road passing Greentoft, the long axis of a field mound runs parallel to the road you're on. It is far larger than anything else this way, being over twice the size of all the other mounds, burnt or otherwise, in the area. The presently grass-covered slopes appear gentle to me. There is the faintest hint of a curve in the face towards the road, but rather than the vague crescent associated with burnt mounds the overall impression is that at some point it has had a huge chunk taken out. The rusty gate to the field stands between erect stones, the left one of which is atypical being so marvellously gnarled _ I have always found it strange that there are no standing stones recorded for Deerness, could this have been one ? wideford Posted by wideford
2nd January 2015ce

Coilleaichur (Enclosure)

Pity about the use of the R word in the site description .
http://canmore.rcahms.gov.uk/en/site/25634/details/urlar/

Pity about the pics too ,weather was freezing and dull . With these trees so close no sun throughout most of the winter .

Looks just like a double walled hut circle .
tiompan Posted by tiompan
1st January 2015ce

Labothie Hill 2 (Cairn(s))

So the final visit on Bractullo Hill or Labothie Hill or Bractullo Moor was another small but nicely situated cairn which can see both the Hatton and Hare cairns. Quite difficult to find, I thought, but my guide had no difficulties as we walked in a south westerly direction from the Hare Cairn. Sitting at 12 meters wide and 0.5 meters high as usual it has been dug into. Some kerbs appear to remain but they might just be simple cairn material.

With that it was head back to the car after an excellent afternoon walking all over whatever this place is called :-)

Visited 30/12/2014.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
31st December 2014ce

Hare Cairn (Cairn(s))

From Labothie head towards the fence and promptly walk west. This takes you the remnants of a badly disturbed cairn. It has been houked and battered. To add to it's misery a fence goes straight thru the middle of it.

Still it must have been massive in its day. Today it stands at 25 meters wide and 1 meter tall. Scattered stones might be kerbs then again they might not.

Visited 30/12/2014.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
31st December 2014ce

Labothie Hill (Cairn(s))

The Labothie cairn is a bit of a mystery. Instead of one massive cairn it appears to be two similar cairns. Both are around 8 meters in width and 1 meter high. Both have been dug into and both have at least a couple of kerbs.

After some serious looking at maps and on Canmore's own site we concluded that Canmore has got it wrong.

Very easy to find from the Hatton Cairn. Spy a rather fine and intact black pill box and head straight for it.

Visited 30/12/2014.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
31st December 2014ce

Hatton (Labothie Hill) (Cairn(s))

This cairn has also taken a bit of a beating but still has some kerbs in place. Still it is 21 meters in width and sits at 0.5 meters tall. The usual hillwalkers cairn sits in the middle. Various bumps and humps within the cairn are spoil heaps.

After taking the extended road e.g. getting lost, phone runs out of power, I finally made it to my guides house. Bractullo Muir and its several cairns was the venue of choice.

We pulled in at a wee car park near Carrot Hill and headed east on a track. Basically head to the top of the hill and the cairn can be found. Nothing difficult with this and nice scenery as well. Loads of birds of prey flying about was nice as well.

Visited 30/12/2014.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
31st December 2014ce
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