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Bar Dyke

Dyke

<b>Bar Dyke</b>Posted by Chris CollyerImage © Chris Collyer
Nearest Town:Sheffield (14km ESE)
OS Ref (GB):   SK246946 / Sheet: 110
Latitude:53° 26' 50.09" N
Longitude:   1° 37' 46.43" W

Added by stubob


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2 posts
Apronful of Stones (Bradfield) Cairn(s)
5 posts
Bar Dyke Ring Cairn(s)
7 posts
Cowell Flat Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork

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<b>Bar Dyke</b>Posted by Chris Collyer <b>Bar Dyke</b>Posted by stubob <b>Bar Dyke</b>Posted by stubob

Fieldnotes

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English Heritage seem particularly undecided on the date of this one, saying probably post-Roman through to possibly as late as 7th century but on the other hand maybe Iron Age or even Bronze Age. So could be anything really.
I wonder if there is a clue in where the northeastern end of the earthwork leads to. As I was driving north away from the site I noticed some strange bumps and small hills to the east just after the two roads join and assumed they were quarry spoil heaps. Checking the maps and internet later I found out these are a natural feature known as Canyards Hills and that Natural England calls them "the most impressive example of 'tumbled ground' in England and Wales" Is it significant that Bar Dyke leads to, or from these hills?
Chris Collyer Posted by Chris Collyer
4th August 2008ce

I can't work out any use for this site. What could it possibly be for. The right hand side (from the north) is used as a car-port by Netherlanders (no offence intended but it was today). It would have been a formidable defence against attackers from the south daveyravey Posted by daveyravey
8th August 2003ce

An earthwork of an unknown date.
The section of the dyke sandwiched between the roads is the most impressive part.
There is an area called Smallfield 200m or so Southeast; a Bronze age/Romano-British Field system.
The whole has been badly disturbed by roads and walls, there is a rubble ring of a possible robbed cairn (Bar Dyke Ring )but it's hard to pick out amongst the heather and a fence and track cut through it.
Worth a look if your between Ash Cabin and the circle at Ewden Beck.
stubob Posted by stubob
11th September 2002ce
Edited 11th December 2002ce

Miscellaneous

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"Bar-dike, which is now the boundary between Broomhead-moor and Smallfield-common, Mr. [Reverand John] Watson conceived to be a British work. It is an immense trench. He further conceived that here the Britons may have made a stand against a body of forces coming from the side of Bradfield, and that their chief being slain in the encounter was buried under that vast carnedde on that part of Broomhead-moor which is known by the name of Roman Slack, and which is by the common people called the 'The apron full of stones.' The name of Roman Slack in Mr. Watson's opinion points out who were the party against whom the Britons were contending, though in what particular expedition he pretends not to say."

from 'Hallamshire', Hunter, J., 1819 ('Hunter's Hallamshire')
Posted by forestal
11th January 2007ce
Edited 13th January 2007ce

Latest posts for Bar Dyke

Showing 1-10 of 14 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Cowell Flat (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Cowell Flat</b>Posted by stubob<b>Cowell Flat</b>Posted by stubob<b>Cowell Flat</b>Posted by stubob<b>Cowell Flat</b>Posted by stubob<b>Cowell Flat</b>Posted by stubob<b>Cowell Flat</b>Posted by stubob stubob Posted by stubob
18th April 2012ce

Cowell Flat (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Fieldnotes

This Bronze Age field system/settlement is worth a look if you're in the area.
Covering around 900 square metres there is plenty to see in the form of field boundaries, cairns and an enclosure containing some kinda 3/4 stone alignment.
March 2004 when I visited the remains were pretty clear of heather and moorland grass; wouldn't know if that's the case now.

Follow the track to the SE from the Bar Dyke, SK246946, for about a quarter of a mile until you are directly above the Agden Side Road.
stubob Posted by stubob
18th April 2012ce

Bar Dyke Ring (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Bar Dyke Ring</b>Posted by Chris Collyer Chris Collyer Posted by Chris Collyer
5th August 2008ce

Bar Dyke Ring (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

I had a root round for this one but there's not much to see (assuming that the site is accurately marked on the OS 1:25000 map) There does seem to be a semi-circular feature to the west of the fence that it evident by the growth of heather more than anything else and a slight change in the vegetation to the north and south where the track beside the fence passes through the cairn. Might be worth a look for the bank in winter. Chris Collyer Posted by Chris Collyer
4th August 2008ce

Apronful of Stones (Bradfield) (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Apronful of Stones (Bradfield)</b>Posted by forestal Posted by forestal
11th January 2007ce
Showing 1-10 of 14 posts. Most recent first | Next 10