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Ceredigion

County

<b>Ceredigion</b>Posted by KammerBedd Taliesin © Simon Marshall
Also known as:
  • Cardiganshire
  • Sir Aberteifi

See individual sites for details

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Web searches for Ceredigion

Sites/Groups in this region:

8 posts
Banc-y-Geufron Kerbed Cairn
3 posts
Banc Blaenegnant Round Cairn
3 posts
Banc Rhosgoch Fach Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
1 post
Banc y Warren Enclosure
29 posts
Bedd Taliesin Chambered Cairn
20 posts
Bryngwyn Bach Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
5 posts
Bryn Goleu Round Cairn
4 posts
Bryn Rhosau Round Barrow(s)
1 post
Bryn Rhudd Cairn(s)
20 posts
Bryn y Gorlan Stone Circle
1 post
Bwlch-y-Crwys Round Barrow(s)
1 post
Caerau Enclosure
1 post
Caer Allt-Goch Hillfort
4 posts
Cae'r Arglwyddes I Round Cairn
3 posts
Caer Lletty-Llwyd Hillfort
3 posts
Caer Penrhos Hillfort
25 posts
Carn Fflur Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
16 posts
Carn Gron Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
2 posts
Carn Nant-y-Llys Cairn(s)
12 posts
Carn Saith-Wraig Cairn(s)
1 post
Carreg Samson Standing Stone / Menhir
3 posts
Carreg Samson (Llethr) Standing Stone / Menhir
1 post
Castell Bach Hillfort
1 post
Castell Bach, Cwmtydu Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
8 posts
Castell Bwa-Drain Hillfort
12 posts
Castell Flemish Hillfort
Castell Mawr Hillfort
1 post
Castell Moeddyn Hillfort
13 posts
Castell Rhyfel Hillfort
11 posts
Castle Grogwynion Hillfort
11 posts
Cerrig yr Wyn Standing Stones
2 posts
Cnwch Eithinog Cairn(s)
4 posts
Cnwch Eithinog Standing Stone / Menhir
5 posts
Copa Hill Ancient Mine / Quarry
8 posts
Craig Ysradmeurig Round Barrow(s)
2 posts
Crug Cou Round Barrow(s)
7 posts
Cwmere Farm Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
9 posts
Cylch Derwyddol Stone Circle
1 post
Darren Camp Hillfort
20 posts
Dolgamfa Circle Kerbed Cairn
1 post
Ffynnon-Wen (Llangybi) Sacred Well
3 posts
Gelli Round Barrow Round Barrow(s)
1 post
Glandwr Isaf Camp Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
6 posts
Groes Fawr Cist
1 post
Hen Gaer Hillfort
5 posts
Llech Bron Standing Stone / Menhir
1 post
Llwyn Crwyn Round Barrow(s)
7 posts
Nant-y-Maen Standing Stone / Menhir
5 posts
Old Warren Hillfort Hillfort
28 posts
Pendinas Hillfort Hillfort
1 post
Pendinas Lochtyn Hillfort
21 posts
Pen-y-Bannau Hillfort
3 posts
2 sites
Pen-y-Castell
4 posts
Pen-y-Felin Wynt Hillfort
13 posts
Pen-y-Ffrwyd Llwyd Camp Hillfort
9 posts
Pen-y-Gurnos Round Barrow(s)
Pen Banc Cairn(s)
3 posts
2 sites
Plas Gogerddan
2 posts
37 sites
Pumlumon and its Environs
2 posts
Trichrug Sacred Hill
1 post
Whilgarn Cairn(s)
21 posts
Ysbyty Cynfyn Christianised Site
9 posts
Y Garn (Carn Gron) Round Cairn
Sites of disputed antiquity:
6 posts
Llwyn-on-Fach Standing Stone / Menhir
4 posts
Nant-y-Ffrwd Standing Stone / Menhir
2 posts
Penbryn Pillar Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
5 posts
Penmaen-Gwyn Standing Stone / Menhir
4 posts
Penrhyn-Coch War Memorial Standing Stone / Menhir
4 posts
St Tyssilio's Churchyard Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
6 posts
Y Garreg Fawr Burial Chamber

News

Add news Add news

Prehistoric forest arises in Cardigan Bay


Skeletal trees of Borth forest, last alive 4,500 years ago and linked to lost kingdom of Cantre'r Gwaelod, appear at shoreline... continues...
moss Posted by moss
21st February 2014ce

Prehistoric landscape uncovered at Borth


From the RCAHMW blog at
http://heritageofwalesnews.blogspot.com/2012/03/prehistoric-landscape-uncovered-at.html

"It’s a race against tide this week at Borth in Ceredigion... continues...
blossom Posted by blossom
13th March 2012ce
Edited 14th March 2012ce

1,000-year-old fishing trap found on Google Earth


Britain's most ancient fishing trap has been discovered off the coastline of Wales after research carried out on Google Earth.

The 853ft (260m) long construction is thought to have been built 1,000 years ago, around the time of the Domesday Book, using large rocks placed on a river bed... continues...
Pilgrim Posted by Pilgrim
16th March 2009ce
Edited 17th March 2009ce

Iron Age Site Dig Open to Public


From an article published on the BBC News web site on 6th August 2006:
Archaeologists excavating an Iron Age farmstead in west Wales say the site may have been home to "several families" as early as 200 BC... continues...
Kammer Posted by Kammer
6th August 2006ce
Edited 10th August 2006ce

Ceredigion Archaeology Day School

A day school aimed at anyone who is interested in the history and archaeology of Ceredigion is running on Saturday 4th March between 10.50 a.m. and 4.30 p.m.

The event is taking place at the Hugh Owen Lecture Theatre, Aberystwyth University [sic].

Cambria Archaeology
Kammer Posted by Kammer
24th February 2006ce

Roman [sic] lead industry found in bog


From an article published on the BBC News web site on 29th July 2005:
Archaeologists have uncovered the remains of a Roman lead smelting site in a peat bog in Ceredigion... continues...
Kammer Posted by Kammer
3rd August 2005ce
Edited 7th February 2006ce

Bronze Age Farms Discovered In Ceredigion Field


Archaeologists were called in to investigate the site near Llandysul after workmen clearing farmland for a new Welsh Development Agency industrial estate noticed dark circles in the soil.

Cambria Archaeology workers then identified several large circular graves from the Bronze Age... continues...
Posted by BrigantesNation
22nd August 2003ce
Edited 7th February 2006ce

Latest posts for Ceredigion

Showing 1-10 of 806 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Carn Fflur (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Carn Fflur</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
29th December 2013ce

Carn Owen (Round Cairn) — Fieldnotes

It would be tempting to speculate that this deceptively well sited monument was so named in honour of Pumlumon's greatest (known) son, Owain Glyndwr. Well, seeing as we are obviously ignorant of the identities of the numerous other great persons once interned in the iconic 'Mother of Rivers' myriad upland cairns, surely no one could argue with the selection of Shakespeare's 'worthy gentleman exceedingly well read'? Then again this could all be spurious conjecture on my part... the name-checked celebrity the late, much lamented Bill Owen from Last of the Summer Wine? Hey, I'd go with either.

'Compo's Cairn' certainly has a bit of a 'ring' about it and, to be fair, appears appropriate to my (admittedly idiosyncratic) mind as I struggle up the steep, southern flank of Cerrig yr Hafan in driving rain, not at all impressed by the accumulation of household rubbish within the abandoned quarry at its foot. Yeah, sadly the old mine/quarry tracks to be found here offer easy access to those in possession of a 4x4... and beyond all help. And to think this is my third attempt to see the cairn. Er, come again? Well, I first noticed Carn Owen last year across the Nant-y-Moch, basking under a peerless blue sky during the ascent of Drosgol. Needless to relate the 'morrow dawned in appalling fashion.... and an attempt last month was curtailed by the closure of the trans-Pumlumon road at both ends. Bastards! Isn't it strange... and primitive... how the desire to 'have' increases with every successive denial, seemingly inversely proportional to the potential prize? Hence, despite having endured a typically turbulent night upon Pumlumon, I'm resolutely determined to be most probably distinctly underwhelmed this morning.... even if it kills me. Happily neither scenario occurs, although I did wonder about the latter for a second during the ascent. OK, a bit longer than that.

Struggling to the top I immediately encounter what looks like a reasonably large, grassed-over cairn. No bad at all. However the map shows Carn Owen to occupy the very summit of the ridge, to the approx south-west. In retrospect this grassy monument is perhaps related to what Coflein cite as 'small satellite cairns... noted to the north-east'? Perhaps. What is certain is the substantial size and excellent siting of Carn Owen itself, the monument located, as promised, at the summit of Cerrig yr Hafan ('Haven Stone'?). The stone pile is a superb viewpoint, worthy of Glyndwr himself in my opinion, particularly looking down upon the Afon Cyneiniog to the approx west, not to mention south toward Llyn Craigypistyll and Disgwylfa Fawr, hill of Bronze Age 'canoe' fame, no less. The vista of Pumlumon across the Nant-y-Moch reservoir upon the northern arc is pretty good, too.... would be even better in clear weather with the main ridge standing proud of cloud. Yeah. But then you would wake up...

There is a wee problem, however. It is far, far too windy to stand anywhere but in the cairn's lee. Consequently I'm obliged to sit. Well, better than involuntarily prostrating myself, head first, in homage to past heroes. As you might expect the centre of Carn Owen has been badly disturbed over time, a notable volume of material subject to slippage. However there is a welcome, unexpected detail in the form of a small stone setting (a cist perhaps?) to the immediate north-west. Nice. What's more, the sun sees fit to break through for a while and make doubly sure I'm truly glad I persevered with Carn Owen. It may well be upon Pumlumon's periphery - and not rise much above 1,500ft - but this is surely a final resting place for heroes.

If you fancy it the easiest approach - although, as mentioned, not necessarily the most salubrious - entails parking above the northern extremity of the Nant-y-Moch Reservoir (same place as for Drosgol), that is a little before the cattle grid and track leading down (eastward) through woodland toward the water, assuming arrival from Ponterwyd. A prominent track heads diagonally uphill here (approx south-ish). Follow this and, upon reaching an abandoned quarry, veer very steeply uphill to the right. Worth the effort. Incidentally it would also appear possible to combine a visit to Disgwylfa Fawr if you fancy making a full day of it?
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
3rd December 2013ce

Bryngwyn Bach (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Images

<b>Bryngwyn Bach</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bryngwyn Bach</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
28th November 2013ce

Carn Fflur (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Images

<b>Carn Fflur</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Carn Fflur</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
28th November 2013ce

Bryngwyn Bach (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Images

<b>Bryngwyn Bach</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bryngwyn Bach</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bryngwyn Bach</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
28th November 2013ce

Carn Fflur (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Fieldnotes

A quartet of large Bronze Age cairns stand upon the summit and western flanks of Carn Fflur, a substantial, afforested hill rising to c1,650ft a couple of miles south of the Cistercian abbey at Strata Florida (Ystrad Fflur). Despite the pedigree of the monastic site - the poet Dafydd ap Gwilym is thought to be buried within its environs, accompanied by numerous Welsh princes of Deheubarth - I'd probably raise a somewhat quizzical eyebrow in surprise... Roger Moore style.... should any member be able to pinpoint Carn Fflur's great cemetery on the map at the first time of asking. No cheating now. Needless to say we will never know the identity of the Bronze Age forbears once interned within the great stone piles; however I can't help feeling they should be accorded at least the same respect as their illustrious followers. A naive notion, perhaps?

I approach the 'Cairn of Flowers' from Bryngwyn Bach, the unassuming high ground to the west. Now there are at least two good reasons for this; primarily to visit the excellent half dozen Bronze Age cairns located upon the latter's north-western slopes... and also to avoid sinking, possibly without trace, within the unfeasibly boggy valley separating the western bank of the Afon Fflur from the lower hill. The river, sourced upon the flanks of Carn Gron to the south, certainly appears to be the focal point of this landscape, not least for an almost 'Pumlumon-esque' concentration of funerary cairns. It is very difficult not to assume at least some correlation between these monuments and the naturally exuberant, flowing water.... the very epitome of vitality, of life itself. Not that I feel that 'vigorous' - at least in the physical sense - as I struggle to cross the deep gulley inexorably carved in the hillside.

Carn Fflur's western cairn lies just beyond at SN73956233, although not depicted upon the current 1:50k OS map. According to Coflein it is a.."probable ring cairn, c.16m in diameter & 0.75m high set eccentrically within a possibly later turf-covered stony ring, c.36m in diameter". Although the least substantial and well defined cairn of the quartet, not to mention rather overgrown, the site possesses a large, well preserved cist. Can't argue with that. Next up is a nice round cairn set upon the north-western slopes of the hill at SN74206245. "10m in diameter & 0.5m high", the outstanding feature is the "remains of an orthostatic kerb-ring on the S & W.."

So, onward and upward to the summit? Er, not yet. Since set upon the steep rise to the approx south of the northern monument at SN74276228 stands a massive cairn which, to be honest, appeared much more substantial than the dimensions attributed to it by Coflein ("24m in diameter & 1.5m high"). The location is excellent with far reaching views to north, west and south toward Carn Gron, the summit cairn of Carn Fflur rearing up upon the eastern horizon to complete the set. The cairn possesses internal detail, Coflein noting "a central disturbance / hollow revealing possible cist elements". Yeah, I concur with that. In addition there is "an embayment on the NW side & an annex, 6.0m across on the NE, are thought to be original features". Clearly this was - is - a complex, enigmatic monument. What is it doing here languishing - or should that be 'revelling' - in utter obscurity? I'm truly gob-smacked. And that's a fact.

I finally clamber up through woodland to the top of Carn Fflur to find the summit cleared of trees. Unfortunately this has resulted in a hill top perhaps resembling a landscape in the devastated aftermath of a hurricane strike. Not a pretty sight. There are compensations, however.... yeah, the large round cairn crowing the summit "25m in diameter & .8m high" is accorded sweeping views, except upon the eastern arc where forestry still prevails. Although by no means the largest such sentinel cairn I've had the great pleasure - not to mention privilege - to spend some time upon, this is a fine, well preserved example of the genre. Again Coflein cite "a central hollow shows possible cist elements". Regrettably I found the internal space defiled by a beer bottle discarded by some individual with 'issues'. The beer was of classy origin. Very unlike its erstwhile owner. Needless to say it is there no longer. Anyway as I sit several rain fronts sweep in to give me quick 'working overs'. Soon, however, they are gone and the sun illuminates the scene with a golden glow. Aye, perfection, my perch the ideal spot to observe the surrounding landscape. Carn Fflur might not be the biggest of peaks, even relative to Mid Wales. But it certainly doesn't disappoint in the vibe stakes.

Walking - nay, wading at times - back to the car (no doubt much to the amused bemusement of the farmer working the field across the river in his tractor) I deliberate upon how Strata Florida has laid claim to the 'spiritual' musings of the majority of visitors to this part of Wales. As for myself.... I much prefer the high ground .... of Carn Gron and Carn Fflur. If you decide to come, please make sure you don't lose your bottle.

[Note: all Coflein quotes are courtesy of J.Wiles (22.07.04)]
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
27th November 2013ce
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