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County Donegal

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<b>County Donegal</b>Posted by fitzcoraldoImage © fitzcoraldo
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Web searches for County Donegal

Sites/groups in County Donegal:

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Ardara Standing Stone / Menhir
10 posts
Ardmore Standing Stone / Menhir
1 post
Ballyargus Standing Stone / Menhir
1 post
Ballybrack Rath
1 post
Ballybrack Standing Stone / Menhir
Ballymagaraghy Standing Stone / Menhir
1 post
Ballymagaraghy Stone Row / Alignment
3 posts
Ballymore Upper Portal Tomb
4 posts
Ballymunterhiggin Court Tomb
7 posts
Barnes Lower Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
8 posts
Barnes Lower Stone Row / Alignment
1 post
Bavan Court Tomb
50 posts
Beltany Stone Circle
8 posts
Binn Portal Tomb
12 posts
Bocan Stone Circle
12 posts
Carnaghan Portal Tomb
6 posts
Carricknamoghil Court Tomb
5 posts
Carrownaganonagh Wedge Tomb
3 posts
Cashelard Portal Tomb
11 posts
Cashel Town Wedge Tomb
13 posts
Claggan Wedge Tomb
8 posts
Claggan Court Tomb
15 posts
Cloghanmore Court Tomb
1 post
Clogher Standing Stone / Menhir
2 posts
Clonbeg Glebe Standing Stone / Menhir
1 post
Cloontagh Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
3 posts
1 site
Cluain tSalach Cup Marked Stone
4 posts
Creevery Upper Portal Tomb
16 posts
Croaghbeg Court Tomb
1 post
Darney Ringfort Hillfort
4 posts
Drumcarbit Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
5 posts
Drumhallagh Upper Court Tomb
1 post
Dunwiley Rath
8 posts
Errarooey Beg Portal Tomb
7 posts
Eskaheen Portal Tomb
10 posts
Farranmacbride Court Tomb
2 posts
Giant's Finger Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
2 posts
Glencolumbkille Churchyard Souterrain
15 posts
Gortnavern Portal Tomb
1 post
The Grey Stone, Cornashesk Natural Rock Feature
21 posts
Grianan of Ailech Stone Fort / Dun
3 sites
Kilclooney More
14 posts
Letter Court Tomb
8 posts
Magheracar Passage Grave
8 posts
2 sites
Magheranaul Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
8 posts
Magheranaul Wedge Tomb
19 posts
Malin More Portal Tomb
7 posts
Marfagh Stone Circle
6 posts
1 site
Meenkeeragh Wedge Tomb
6 posts
Mevagh Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
12 posts
Muntermellan Portal Tomb
1 post
Na Dúnaibh Stone Fort / Dun
1 post
Pluck Standing Stone / Menhir
5 posts
Portleen Stone Row / Alignment
6 posts
Rashenny Chambered Tomb
1 post
Rathdonnell Rath
Roshin South Portal Tomb
13 posts
Shalwy Court Tomb
1 post
Straths Bridge Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
3 posts
St Columkille's Stones Cup Marked Stone
7 posts
Templemoyle Portal Tomb
12 posts
Temple of Deen Court Tomb
8 posts
Toome Portal Tomb
1 post
Tory Island Bullaun Stone

News

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Ancient stone chamber unearthed in garden


From the Derry Journal

An ancient underground chamber which could date back 2,000 years has been unearthed near Clonmany in Inishowen... continues...
baza Posted by baza
18th August 2008ce

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Photographs:<b>County Donegal</b>Posted by donegal Artistic / Interpretive:<b>County Donegal</b>Posted by fitzcoraldo

Latest posts for County Donegal

Showing 1-10 of 487 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

St Columkille's Stones (Cup Marked Stone) — Folklore

In Gartan Co Donegal there is a huge stone which is kept in remembrance of St Colmcille. Long ago some Protestants were removing this stone and trying to hide it on the Catholics. When they had it some distance away a plague of black rats surrounded them so they thought they would leave the stone back again and when they did so the rats disappeared. The Protestants never interfered with the stone again.
From the Schools Collection of the 1930s, now being transcribed at Duchas.ie.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
20th April 2016ce

Clogher (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Folklore

There is a great stone in Clogher till the present day and there was a giant buried under it. One day a man from Eglish was over there and he lifted one of the stones. He looked down and saw a bottle. When he was about to lift the second stone a voice called to him to get away from that grave. He left that moment and for a long time he never was seen about Clogher. About seven years after that he was after sheep about the same place. When he came near the grave he saw a man sitting on the stone which lay over it. He heard him singing a song about if any man would lift that stone that he would be put to death before the end of that week. From that day to this no one went near these few stones. It is to be found on the farm of Kathleen Kelly of Clogher.
From the Schools Collection of the 1930s, now being transcribed at duchas.ie. Perhaps this is the stone at Clogher (or perhaps there's another).
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
20th April 2016ce

Rathdonnell — Folklore

This was told to me by Mick Carbry, Socker. In Rathdonell house there was a man who lived there, his name was Staffard. There was a big fort around the house. Staffard had a horse which he liked very much. Staffard died, and the minute he did, the horse came to the door step and died.
The people put the 'trace' of the horse on Staffard's tombstone. He is buried in Douglas. There was a fort round this house, and the Danes planted a lot of trees around the fort. There was a fight and the trees hid and saved the Danes from being shot. There was supposed to be a ghost seen in Rathdonell house ever since.
From the Schools Collection of the 1930s, now being transcribed at Duchas.ie.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
15th April 2016ce

Dunwiley (Rath) — Folklore

Long ago there was a stone wall round Dunwiley fort. One time a man named Thomas Gallagher took the field in which the fort was situated for grazing. He sent his men to toss the wall. When the men put the stones on the carts the horses fell dead. It is said that this happened because the ground was "gentle."
Shortly after this Thomas himself died.
From the 1930s Schools Collection, now being transcribed at duchas.ie.

Similar retellings here, here and here, and a different story about the fort is here..
There is a fort outside Stranorlar called Dunwiley Fort. Two men went to this fort to hunt one night about 12 o clock. They had two hounds with them. As they approached the top of the fort they noticed the hounds were afraid and looking round they saw a little woman who wore a red cloak. The men were afraid and ran away. After this one of the men took ill.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
14th April 2016ce

Giant's Finger Stone (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Folklore

I've scoured the maps so hard to find the location of this story, and I think it could be right next to this stone. That is, there's a lough with no water coming in or out, and on the historic 6" map a "Rock" is marked next to the lough. Please let me have it, I mean it's not like you get a 50 ft whistling eel in a story every day, and surely with the Danes involved there must be some ancient connection. There's a hill called Cashelbane close to the west, but we need a rock and a lough for the eel. I'm confused and need to visit.
The townland of Croagh lies half way between Calhame school and Binbawn Crossroads. In this district there is an ancient spot called Castlebawn where the Danes are supposed to have castles long ago. There they lived for many a year. On the Castlebawn a large grey stone whose circumference is about one hundred ft and whose height is about forty ft. This stone is said to mark the spot called the Golden Well where the Danes on their retreat from Croagh were supposed to hide their gold. One of the Danes was supposed to lift this large stone in his mighty hand and put it on top of the gold. The track of his five fingers are plain to see in it ever since. After the retreat of the Danes the old people who lived in those ages often gathered to the Castlebawn and tried to remove the stone to procure the hidden treasure.
When they would set to work with picks spades and shovels there would come out of the blind lough near by a whistling eel said to be fifty feet long. This monster would perch itself on top of the stone and lash its tail in every direction. Its whistles at the same time could be heard for miles around. The men would get so frightened at the whistling eel that they would run for home.
This whistling used to continue evening after evening for a long time. Then the men decided never to go near the stone.
Eventually the whistling eel disappeared but there the stone remains. It has ever since been called the Stone of the Hidden Treasure.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
10th April 2016ce

The Grey Stone, Cornashesk (Natural Rock Feature) — Folklore

This huge boulder, shaped like a chair, is the property of Mrs. McMonagle of Corrasheisk, Killygordon. A giant, long since dead, is supposed to have used it as a seat long ago. As an explanation of how the stone got there it is said that two giants over in Lismulladuff Glen - about three miles away- were testing their strength to see which could throw the stone the greater distance. The giant who won the test threw his stone on top of Cornasheisk Mt. and decided henceforth he would live there.
A little distance below the stone a huge tombstone marks the spot where the giant lies buried. The tombstone is cut out in the shape of the giants's own body. Writing can be traced on the upper surface of the stone but it is so blurred that it is impossible to decipher it. Local tradition has it that a great treasure lies buried in this grave.
The hill's also called Ballyarrell Mountain and the stone is on a steep south-facing slope. The story is from the Schools Collection of the 1930s which is currently being transcribed at duchas.ie.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
5th April 2016ce

Ballyargus (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Folklore

The information on the Historic Environment Viewer says this stone is 1.2m high × 0.7m wide × 0.6m thick, with a shallow depression on top. There's a quartz stone nearby too, 0.6m high × c. 0.7m × 0.6m. And "according to local tradition the standing stone was used as a Mass Rock". There's a story from the Schools Collection of the 1930s transcribed at duchas.ie:
It is a large stone standing upright with a large white stone to the Moville side.
One side of the stone has mouldered away with the storm.
The owner of the field was asked to remove the stone but he objected. He said his mother told him not to remove it for any quantity of gold or silver. The stone has been there for thousands of years and the story has been handed down from sire to son. It has been called from the beginning of time "the standing stone" or "the fairy grove."
It is about four feet high and two feet broad.

It is said that some of the older people who are not alive nowadays, saw a fairy appear, and this belief still holds good to the ones who owns the fields with the stone, which it contains, and they won't remove it.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
5th April 2016ce

Ballybrack (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Folklore

I got this story from Michael Gillespie. He lives in Ballymacarter. He told me that his uncle told him about a giant who lived in Magilligan. He was a strong man. He was twelve foot high. He and another man were quarrying stones. This giant could lift a stone over a ton in weight. They came on a stone which was long and flat. They found some treasure under the stone. Away they went and got drunk. They began to fight about which of them could lift the stone. The giant said he would throw it to the other side of the water. He did so and it is there in Ballybrack since.
From the Schools Collection made in the 1930s, and now being digitised at duchas.ie. There is another story about the stone here...
There is a "standing stone" in Ballybrack. People of the neighbourhood say that this stone was thrown from Magilligan by a giant before he had got his breakfast. Other people say that a great warrior is buried there and that the stone was put there to mark the grave.
and here...
Stands upright out of the ground by the roadside at Ballybrack, Moville. About 4 1/2 feet high and 4 yards from the roadside. There are marks on it, some people say it is ancient writing.
Finn McCool is said to have thrown it from the other side of Lough. Another version or legend says it marks the grave of a Dane, for Danes occupied L. Foyle in their day.
It is also said that two giants were fighting, one on either side of L. Foyle, and that this stone was thrown from the Derry side and struck the Giant in the head and crushed him into the ground here.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
5th April 2016ce

Giant's Finger Stone (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Folklore

The note on the Historic Environment Viewer map claims there's no trace of this stone now. But it's a forested boggy area... can we hope it's just slipped out of view?
Long ago when Fionn Mc Cool and his companions were hunting the wild deer in Connacht they came to a little house which was built under the shadow of a high cliff. Being tired and hungry they thought they would get something to eat in it. Upon knocking at the door it was opened by an old woman who inquired what they wanted. Upon learning that they were hungry and thirsty she invited them inside and set a fine meal before them. When they had eaten and drunk their fill they returned out again. Great was their surprise to find another group of warriors sitting on the green outside the house. Fionn recognised their leader as his old enemy Goll Mac Morna. At this time there was a truce between them. Both companies saluted one another cordially enough. After they had conversed a while they began some games. Everything went on well for a while.

Now it happened there was a huge stone near by and this stone was supposed to cover the entrance to a fairy dwelling. Goll challenged Fionn to lift the stone from the entrance. Fionn was loth to do so for as we knew he was tired of the chase before hand. This only caused Goll and his companions to laugh and they taunted Fionn saying that he was not able to perform this feat. This enraged Fionn who started up and getting a good hold of the stone tried to enforce it out of its place. He found to his sorrow he was unable to do so. This made Goll and his friends laugh and you may be sure that this did not please Fionn and his heroes.

A battle between the two parties was imminent when the old woman came out of the house and reproached them with causing her so much annoyance. When they told her of the challenge and how Fionn had failed she went into the house again. She came out in a few minutes carrying a ripe yellow apple which she handed to Fionn, telling him at the same time to eat half of it and throw the other half over his left shoulder. When he had done this she told him to lift the stone now. Going over to sit the second time he caught hold of it and with one mighty heave pulled the stone from its bed. All who witnessed this mighty feat were amazed. Then lifting it over his head he gave it a mighty cast over the sea. The stone kept on flying in the air and at last it fell on the top of a hill near the town now known as Killybegs.

It bears the tracks of Fionn's fingers even to this day and ever since it has been called Fionn's Finger Stone. It is said that when a person goes up on top of the stone he would feel as if he were sailing through the air.
From the 1930s Schools Collection, now being digitised at duchas.ie.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
5th April 2016ce

Portleen (Stone Row / Alignment) — Folklore

There are two stones known as "the standing stones" in a field about one hundred yards above the school-house.
There is a story told that one time two giants were on the top of Lough Salt hill. They thought they would try their skill and see which would throw the farther. One giant threw his stone and his stone fell into this field. The other giant threw his stone and it fell about three inches in front of the first stone.
From the Schools Collection collected in the 1930s, and now being digitised at duchas.ie.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
5th April 2016ce
Showing 1-10 of 487 posts. Most recent first | Next 10