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County Clare

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<b>County Clare</b>Posted by bawn79Craggaunowen © Bawn79 © 2007
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Sites/groups in County Clare:

Ardataggle Wedge Tomb
2 sites
Ballycroum
10 posts
Ballyhickey Wedge Tomb
7 posts
Ballymihil Wedge Tomb
2 posts
Ballytarsna Artificial Mound
2 posts
The Bargaining Stone - Inishcealtra Natural Rock Feature
1 post
Bohateh North Chambered Tomb
5 posts
62 sites
The Burren
4 posts
Caher Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
3 posts
Cahermore Stone Fort / Dun
8 posts
Caherphuca Wedge Tomb
1 post
Cappaghkennedy Wedge Tomb
7 posts
Clooney Stone Row / Alignment
4 posts
Cloonyconry More Wedge Tomb
4 posts
Coolbaun Portal Tomb
8 posts
Corbehagh Wedge Tomb
1 post
1 site
Corbehagh Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
1 post
1 site
Corbehagh South Wedge Tomb
5 posts
3 sites
Craggaunowen Portal Tomb
3 posts
Craglea Natural Rock Feature
2 posts
Craughaun Cemetery Wedge Tomb
4 posts
Curraghadoo Cairn(s)
3 posts
2 sites
Doolin Round Barrow(s)
2 posts
Doolin Stone Axe Production Site Ancient Mine / Quarry
1 post
Doonmeave Promontory Fort
7 posts
Formoyle More West Wedge Tomb
2 posts
1 site
Iniscaltra Christianised Site
4 posts
Killaloe Standing Stone / Menhir
6 posts
Knappogue Standing Stones
3 posts
Knappogue N Standing Stone / Menhir
5 posts
Knockshanvo Wedge Tomb
2 posts
Knockstoolery Standing Stone / Menhir
2 posts
1 site
Magh Adhair Artificial Mound
6 posts
Milltown Wedge Tomb
7 posts
Mooghaun Hillfort
10 posts
Moyree Commons Portal Tomb
6 posts
Newgrove Wedge Tomb
4 posts
Rosslara Wedge Tomb
8 posts
Teergonean Court Tomb
5 posts
1 site
Tyredagh Lower Standing Stone / Menhir
Violethill Wedge Tomb

News

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6,000 year old Tsunami in Ireland?


Archeologists have uncovered evidence of pre-farming people living in the Burren more than 6,000 years ago — one of the oldest habitations ever unearthed in Ireland... continues...
mascot Posted by mascot
10th May 2012ce
Edited 11th May 2012ce

Folklore

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(As usual when it comes to Ireland I am being a bit pathetic with pinning the stories to locations. But I hope the locations still exist).
.. Avowedly malignant ceremonies have been performed at two, if not three, places in East Clare. At Carnelly, near Clare Castle, at an unknown period remote even in 1840, "a black cock, without a white feather," was offered to the Devil on the so-called "Druid's Altar," two fallen pillars near an earthen ring beside the avenue, --to avenge the sacrificer on an enemy, but in this case it brought an equivalent misfortune on the sacrificer himself.

The Duchess de Rovigo, an heiress of the last Stamer of Carnelly, used the story, combined with irrelevant family legends and pseudo-archaeology, in a poem dated 1839, but I obtained it, as given above, from a more reliable source, her mother, in 1875 and 1882, as well as from my brothers and sisters, who heard it in "the forties".

When I was at the dolmen near the house at Maryfort in 1869, an old servant, Mrs. Eliza Ega (nee Armstrong), said to me, -- "Don't play at that bad place where the dhrudes (druids), glory be to God! offered black cocks to the Devil!"
A Folklore Survey of County Clare (Continued)
Thos. J. Westropp
Folklore, Vol. 22, No. 1. (Mar. 31, 1911), pp. 49-60.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
7th December 2007ce

Links to lots of folklore at the Clare County Library website (much of which relates to the ancient sites of Clare).
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/folklore/index.htm
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
20th June 2006ce

Links

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A Survey of Monuments in the Barony of Bunratty Lower, Co. Clare


A Survey of Monuments of Archaeological and Historical Interest in the Barony of Bunratty Lower, Co. Clare by William Gerrard Ryan

This part of the thesis discusses the various types of monuments of archaeological and historical interest that were noted in the Barony of Bunratty Lower, Co. Clare. Each type of site is examined in turn, under the headings: distribution, features, dating and related sites in Ireland.
fitzcoraldo Posted by fitzcoraldo
5th July 2007ce

Clare County Library


Links to information and photos of ancient monuments in the county.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
20th June 2006ce

Clare County Library


Historical maps of County Clare.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
20th June 2006ce

Ring-Forts in the Barony of Moyarta, Co. Clare, and Their Legends


fitzcoraldo Posted by fitzcoraldo
9th January 2006ce

Latest posts for County Clare

Showing 1-10 of 458 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Cahercommaun (Stone Fort / Dun) — Fieldnotes

I have to agree with Ryaner below about this being one of the most impressive sites in the Burren.
It is similar to Dun Aeognus on the Aran Islands in that it uses a cliff face as a natural defence to the north.

Here is a link to an aerial view on Bing Maps to get a better idea of its plan http://binged.it/13C2kNd

I seem to recall that the valley to the north of it acted as an east - west transport link across the Burren so this would have been a controlling point on this route.
bawn79 Posted by bawn79
15th August 2013ce

Cahercommaun (Stone Fort / Dun) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Cahercommaun</b>Posted by bawn79<b>Cahercommaun</b>Posted by bawn79<b>Cahercommaun</b>Posted by bawn79 bawn79 Posted by bawn79
15th August 2013ce

Creevagh (Wedge Tomb) — Images

<b>Creevagh</b>Posted by bawn79 bawn79 Posted by bawn79
15th August 2013ce

Parknabinnia (Cl. 67) (Wedge Tomb) — Images

<b>Parknabinnia (Cl. 67)</b>Posted by bawn79 bawn79 Posted by bawn79
13th August 2013ce

Craglea (Natural Rock Feature) — Images

<b>Craglea</b>Posted by bawn79 bawn79 Posted by bawn79
8th July 2013ce

Doonmeave (Promontory Fort) — Folklore

The third [fort in the area] is much defaced but of greater note. It is called Doonmeeve on the maps, but Doonmihil and Dooneeva, locally. There are two segments of curved fosses coming out at a slope near the shore; they are cut through drift, and when a block of shale was met with it was neatly cut to the slope of the bank. the inner is dry, but a water runnel courses down the outer one. They are 6' to 10' deep and wide at the bottom in parts, the inner 28', and the outer 20' wide at the top. The bank between these is 22' wide at the top. It probably enclosed a space on the cliffs, and could hardly be a promontory fort whose promontory was washed away by the unresting sea. Bronze implements have been found on the shore at the foot of the cliff which bounds its enclosure.

A very curious tradition as told us in the neighbourhood. A certain man, in not very remote past years, began to dig up the space inside its trenches, before he had been long at work he fell down and lay to all appearance dead. News was brought at once to his wife a reputed "wise woman," who was evidently equal to the emergency. She rushed to the nearest fairy spot, did magic, and ran to Dooneva to her apparently lifeless husband. She then addressed herself to the unseen inhabitants of the fort and imperiously ordered them to bring back her husband at once. Rapidly as the deceased brother of the unvirtuous de Birchington, of Ingoldsby, the insensible man sat up and recovered complete strength, while a stick was carried off in his stead. After all the story in its facts, apart from their deductions, may very well have happened, and even the charms may have been done in as good faith as many others worked to our personal knowledge.
In Thomas Johnson Westropp's Ancient Remains Near Lehinch, Co. Clare, online at Limerick City Library.

There's a rather amusing photo of the author posing amidst ancient stones (and clutching his umbrella in a prepared fashion) on Wikipedia.

I wonder if the 'stick carried off in his stead' alludes to when the fairies replace healthy babies with a 'stock', a lump of wood disguised to look and act like a sickly baby.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
13th March 2013ce

Poulnabrone (Portal Tomb) — Links

Bouncy Poulnabrone on Youtube.


As per title, a bouncy Poulnabrone.
harestonesdown Posted by harestonesdown
13th March 2013ce

Lissateeaun (Rath) — Folklore

From that spa-town [Lisdoonvarna] we go eastward, crossing the river valley, and seeing on a bold bluff a lofty mound - a reputed "fairy hill."

Lissateeaun, Lis an tsidhean, the fairy fort, lies in a townland called Gowlaun, from the "fork" (Gabhal) of the stream. It is a mote-like mound, shaped out of the natural bluff, but raised and rounded so as to form a high flat-topped platform sufficiently imposing as seen from the road bridge to the east. A shallow fosse runs round it on the side of the plateau in a semicircle. There are no other mounds or hut sites, nor is it easy to fix its actual height, as it runs into the natural slopes. The summit lies about 400 feet above the sea.

Its resemblance to a burial mound may have helped its reputation as a sidh, but it very probably was, if not in origin, at least in use, a true lis or residential fort, as its name implies. Sidhean in Co. Clare living usage, by the way, implies rather a passing gust or whirl of wind in which the fairies travel. It is a prophylactic usage to bow or take off your hat as the gust reaches you.

The fort is reputed to give its name to the Castle of Lisdoonvarna, "the fortified fort of the gap." The gap is the river gully, and the levelled ring wall at the head of the slope to the north is Caherbarna.
From Thomas Johnson Westropp''s article on the Burren in Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland v 5 (sixth series) 1915.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
3rd March 2013ce
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