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Old Barrow (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Miscellaneous

Details of barrow on Pastscape

[SS 84153241] Old Barrow (NR) Withypoole No 7, a bowl barrow 13 paces diameter and 2.5 ft. high with a hollow in the centre. It is enclosed by a bank with outer ditch which is not concentric with the barrow and is clearly a tree-clump enclosure, probably 18th century. (2)Scheduled. (3)
Old Barrow is at SS 84083244, the feature has been omitted from the OS6 inch and the name erroneously applied to a pit. It appears to be a very robbed bowl barrow, 0.9m high the bank mentioned by Grinsell is not well defined and has only slight traces of an outer ditch. Although clearly later than the barrow it is not certainly a tree-ring, and it may have been formed when the barrow was robbed. (See GPs AO/65/192/5 & 6).Published 1:2500 survey revised. (4)SS 84093244. Withypoole 7. Old Barrow listed, details as Authy 2.Visited by Grinsell 25th May 1958. (5)
[SS 84083244] Old Barrow (NR) (6)
Old Barrow, a prehistoric barrow, is centred at SS 84083244 at the eastern end of the ridge forming Old Barrow Down. It is a circular earth and stone mound, 20.9m in diameter and 1.2m high and has been heavily disturbed by robbing or excavation trenches. These appear as two, sharp-sided, concentric circular cuttings 1.5m wide and 0.3m deep. Their shallowness suggests that they are less likely to be stone robbing trenches and more likely to be the result of an antiquarian attempt to define a kerb within the monument. Such an event does not appear to be documented but has been noted elsewhere on Exmoor (see SS 83 SW 2 and SS 73 NW 10 (D)).
Aspect: Old Barrow has extensive views in all directions.Vegetation: Grass with some reeds. (7)
The probable Bronze Age round barrow known as Old Barrow is clearly visible as an earthwork on aerial photographs of the 1940s onwards.On the aerial photographs available to the survey the monument can be seen as a mound circa 10 metres in diameter with evidence of disturbance visible as an off-centre pit about 4.5 metres in diameter. The mound appears to be enclosed by a narrow bank which in turn is surrounded by a ditch less than 1.5 metres wide, and finally an outer bank. It is possible these are also evidence of antiquarian disturbance as suggested by authority 7 above. (8-11)
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17th December 2014ce

Knackers Hole Cairn (Cairn(s)) — Miscellaneous

Details of Cairn on Pastscape

[ST 1572 3970] TUMULUS [GT] Descending Dowsborough in its direction of Holford, is a large cairn lying on the slope to the right of the green path. It is surrounded by a shallow trench. (2)
(13) A ruined cairn with two recent stone heaps in middle. Low mound enclosed by ditch and outer bank. Query whether saucer barrow or steading of an outpost to the hillfort. Overall 19 paces x 3/4 ft. (3)
This is a robbed cairn. The unsurveyable traces of a ditch and outer bank seem to have resulted from robbing stone from just within the rim and thereby producing a shallow trench. The cairn is 0.4m high excluding the modern stone heaps.Surveyed at 1/2500. (4)
The possible Bronze Age round barrow or cairn, described by the previous authorities, survives as earthworks on a slope overlooking Knacker's Hole. It is visible on aerial photographs as an amorphous mound, with a diameter of 14.5m, surrounded by a ring ditch with a diameter of 19m. The cairn appears to have been dug into, possibly for stone, and some of the material from the mound appears to have been dumped over the ditch. It is situated amid a Medieval and/or Post Medieval field system (ST 13 NE 98)but it is unclear if it has ploughed around or over.
(5-7)An embanked platform cairn lies at the head of an un-named combe, above Knackers Hole, at ST 1572 3970. The cairn comprises a circular, flat-topped mound, 19m in diameter and 0.8m high, with an incomplete bank around its periphery. The interior of the site is rather disturbed, but the mound, 4m in diameter and 0.8m high in the south of the interior is most likely to an original feature.
The site was recorded at a scale of 1:200 using graphic methods as part of the EH survey of the Quantock Hills AONB (8).
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17th December 2014ce

Cutcombe (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

Details of barrow on Pastscape

[SS 96493571) Cutcombe Barrow (NR). Brompton Regis No.1, a bowl barrow 23 paces diameter and 3.5 ft.high. (2)
This is a bowl barrow 1.3 m. high. Surveyed at 1/2500. (3)
SS 96503571. Brompton Regis 1. Cutcombe Barrow listed, details as Authy 2. Visited by Grinsell 10th May 1952. He suspects that the name Cutcombe Barrow may possibly have been originated by the OrdnanceSurvey during the original survey of 1790-1810 for convenience of referece. It is named Western Barrow on the 1838 tithe map (but the present name appears on OS 1" first edition 1809). (4)
The barrow known as Cutcombe Barrow lies at the edge of a pasture field, and measures 22 m in diameter and 1.7 m high. It comprises a smoothed grass covered mound. On its eastern side the hedgebank clips the edge of the barrow and several large quartz blocks are visible on the ground. (5)
The remains of the Bronze Age bowl barrow described by the previous authorities was seen as an earthwork and mapped from aerial photographs. (6)
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17th December 2014ce

Leather Barrow (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

Details of barrow on Pastscape

Bowl barrow, known as Leather Barrow, on Withiel Hill. The earth and stone barrow mound measures 23 metres in diameter and 3.3 metres high. It stands at the junction of three boundary banks which form the remains of a field system (NMR 1128212) of possible post medieval date and may have been used as a point of alignment during the construction of the banks. The boundary which runs south from the junction forms part of the Luxborough and Treborough parish boundary.
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17th December 2014ce

Joaney How (Cairn(s)) — Miscellaneous

Details of cairn on Pastscape

[SS 9082 4278] Joaney How [NR]
[SS 9082 4278] Joaney How (Beacon) [NR]. (1-2)
Cairn or beacon known as "Joaney How" or (a) "Yonney How" on Luccombe Hill. A structure of piled stones much mutilated and having several depressions with ridges between. The surface stones are very loose as if moved in recent times. On the top is a roughly conical pile of stones, wide at the bottom, and about 3ft. in height, again, possibly rebuilt after destruction. Diameter of exposed stones - about 62ft. Scheduled under Burial Mounds.
This is a disturbed cairn 1.7 metres high. (See G.P.s AO/65/126/1 and 2.) Grinsell lists it as Luccombe No. 4; and although he records a "partly visible" ditch no certain traces can be identified. Resurveyed at 1:2500. (5)
[SS 9082 4279] Luccombe 4. Joaney How, a mutilated cairn 27 paces diameter and 5ft. high, surmounted by a modern stone-heap. Ditch partly visible. Visited by Grinsell Whitsun 1958. Joaney How and Robin How (SS 94 SE 2) were shown as Luckham Barrows on O.S. 1" first edition 1809, and as Luccombe Barrows on the map by
W. C. Cox 1829 and in Savage (c). The earliest appearance of Robin and Joaney How on the maps appears to be on the O.S. 6" 1889. (6)
Joaney How, Robin How (SS 94 SW 2) and adjacent mount (SS 94 SW 4).
Scheduled. (7)
A large cairn, known as Joaney How, lies on the edge of a natural terrace in a false crest position on the N slope of Dunkery Hill at SS 90813 42789. It comprises a circular stony mound, enclosed by a heather covered ring, 22m in diameter and 1.8m high. The stony mound is flat topped. The evidence for this being the site of a beacon comes from the OS 25" first edition map (Somerset 34.14), there is no other evidence that this was the case. The cairn was surveyed using differential GPS as part of the RCHME Exmoor Project (8).
Round cairn known as Joaney How. Part of a round cairn cemetery on Dunkery Hill. Traditionally thought to be named after Little John. Scheduled. (9)
The cairn known as Joaney How has been transcribed as earthworks from aerial photographs as part of the Exmoor National Mapping Programme survey. The cairn appears to be circa 24 metres in diameter and centred on circa SS 90814279. It is one of eight cairns recorded as part of the survey in this area, although more are present but not visible on the aerial photographs available. (10-11)
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17th December 2014ce

Robin How (Cairn(s)) — Miscellaneous

Details of cairn on Pastscape

[SS 9077 4272] Robin How [NR] [SS 9077 4272] Robin How (Beacon) [NR]
Cairn of beacon known as "Robin How" on the Luccombe-Wootton Courtney parish boundary. On it there are two conical erections one to N., one to S., each about 3ft. high. Between them the mound has a flat top composed of smaller stones than elsewhere. Diameter of exposed stones about 62ft., height above the moor excluding the surmounting stone heaps - 6ft. (3) Scheduled under Burial Mounds (4). (3)(4)
This is a disturbed cairn 1.6 metres high and listed by Grinsell as Luccombe No. 3. As Grinsell suggests, a quarry pit 0.7 metres deep against the east side of the cairn probably provided its material.
(See G.P.s AO/65/126/3 and 4.)Resurveyed at 1:2500. (5)
[SS 9076 4272] Luccombe 3. Robin How, cairn 24 paces diameter, 10ft. high. The material may have come from quarry pits to the east, north-east and south-east. Visited by Grinsell Whitsun 1958. Robin How and Joaney How (SS 94 SW 3) were shown as Luckham Barrows on O.S. 1" first edition, 1809, and as Luccombe Barrows on the map by W. C. Cox 1829 and in Savage (b). The earliest appearance of Robin and Joaney How on the maps appears to be on the O.S. 6" 1889. (6) Joaney How (SS 94 SW 3), Robin How and adjacent mound (SS 94 SW 4).Scheduled. (7)
The large cairn known as Robin How lies on Dunkery Hill at SS 90761 42724. It comprises a large, circular mound of stone, enclosed by a heather and turf covered bank. The cairn measures 21.5m in diameter and stands 2m high. The eastern side is flanked by a large pit, 19m N-S, 8m E-W and 0.8m deep, probably the source of material for the cairn. The stone mound is flat topped, and has probably been re-worked recently, as there is no sign of the two conical erections mentioned by authy 3. The evidence for this being the site of a beacon comes from the OS 25" first edition map (Somerset 34.14), there is no other evidence that this was the case. The cairn was surveyed using differential GPS as part of the RCHME East Exmoor Project (8).
Surveyed at 1:500 scale with EDM, 24 February 2000 (9).
Round cairn known as Robin How. Part of round cairn cemetery on Dunkery Hill. Traditionally thought to be named after Robin Hood. Scheduled. (10)
The cairn known as Robin How has been transcribed as earthworks from aerial photographs as part of the Exmoor National Mapping Programme survey. The cairn appears to be circa 25 metres in diameter and centred on circa SS 90764272. It is one of eight cairns recorded as part of the survey in this area, although more are present but not visible on the aerial photographs available. (11-12)
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17th December 2014ce

Dunkery Beacon (Cairn(s)) — Miscellaneous

Details of cairns on Pastscape

Five cairns of probable Bronze Age date are visible on the summit of Dunkery Beacon. The cairns were surveyed by English Heritage in August 2004 in response to a request by The National Trust and have been transcribed as closely as possible during the Exmoor National Mapping Programme survey. The group was previously recorded as both UID 35995 and 35990, but have now been combined into 35990 utilizing Grinsell's numbering scheme and with a concordance with the Scheduled Monument numbers.
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17th December 2014ce

Dunkery Hill — Miscellaneous

Details of barrow on Pastscape

SS 90874277. Prehistoric round cairn cemetery on Dunkery Hill. The cemetery comprises at least five round cairns, including three distinctive examples each surrounded by a low bank. These cairns, which include Robin How (SE 94 SW 2) and Joaney How (SE 94 SW 3) appear to have formed the focus of the cemetery. The third, unnamed, cairn (SE 94 SW 4) lies further to the south. Two further cairns lie to the east and north east. Three small mounds, east of Joaney How, have been interpreted as cairns but may be later in date than the others. Scheduled. (1)
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17th December 2014ce

Selworthy Beacon (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Miscellaneous

Details of burial cairns on Pastscape

A group of 11 well preserved Bronze Age burial cairns on Selworthy Beacon.

Minehead Without 1. At SS 91884799 a mound 20 paces across by 3 feet
high, probably a barrow.
Minehead Without 2. At SS 92184803 is a bowl barrow 13 paces across
by 3.5 ft high with a hollow centre.
Minehead Without 3. At SS 92304804 is a bowl barrow 13 paces across
by 2.5 ft high with a hollow centre.
Minehead Without 4. At SS 92334801 is a truncated bowl barrow 15
paces x 2 ft.
Minehead Without 4a. At SS 92484798 is a hollow centred barrow 10
paces x 3 ft.
Minehead Without 4b. At SS 92544796 is a hollow centred barrow 16
paces by 3 ft.
Minehead Without 5. At SS 92494791 is a barrow 13 paces across by 4
ft high with a hollow centre (the heap to the west may be a robbers'
spoil heap).
Minehead Without 6. At SS 92504792 is a mound but it is uncertain
whether it is a robbers' spoil heap or a round barrow.
Minehead Without 7. At SS 92554790 is a barrow 16 pace x 1 ft high.
Minehead Without 8. At SS 92604785 [No other information].
Minehead Without 9. At SS 92604783 [No other information]. (1)

Grinsell's Nos 2,3,4,5,7, and 8 are published on OS 25".
1 at 'A' SS 91884798 is Selworthy Beacon. A modern cairn stands on
what may be the remains of a truncated cairn though it may only be a
beacon platform.
2 at 'B' SS 92174804 and 3 at 'C' SS 92294803 are undisturbed bowl
barrows.
4a at 'D' SS 92404803 is a bowl barrow with a hollow centre.
4b at 'E' SS 92414802 and 8 at 'L' SS 92604783 are truncated bowl
barrows.
5 at 'F' SS 92504790 is probably a pair of confulent bowl barrows. Theeastern one has a large hole in the centre and overlies a smaller bowlto the west at SS 92494790 (considered by Grinsell to be a spoil
heap).
4 at 'G' SS 92314801 and 7 at 'H' SS 92544789 are both truncated
cairns.
A small low heather covered mound at 'K' SS 92414797 is rather
doubtful bowl barrow.
6 at 'J' SS 92514790 is a rectangular mound and is almost centainly
material taken from the centre of 5.
'M' a further barrow published to the south west of 8 has been
completely destroyed.
See GPs AO/65/177/3-8 and AO/65/180 3-8
Surveyed at 1:2500. (2)

('B' SS 921174804; 'C' SS 92294803; 'D' SS 92414803) Tumuli (NR)
('F' SS 92504790) Tumuli (NR)
('G' SS 92314801) Cairn (NR)
('H' SS 92544789) Cairn (NR)
('L' SS 92604783) Tumulus (NR) (3)

'A' SS 91884799. Minehead Without 1. Selworthy Beacon listed as
Authy. 1. Probably used as a beacon.
'B' SS 92174804. Minehead Without 2. As Authy 1.
'C' SS 92294804. Minehead Without 3. As Authy 1.
'G' SS 92324801. Minehead Without 4. As Authy 1.
'D' SS 92404803. Minehead Without 5. Bowl barrow 10 pace diameter 2
ft high with hollow in centre.
'E' SS 92424803. Minehead Without 6. Bowl barrow 16 paces diameter, 3ft high with large hollow in centre.
'K' SS 92414797. Minehead Without 7. Bowl barrow.
'F' SS 92514791. Minehead Without 8. Bowl barrow 13 paces diameter
and 3 ft high.
'F' SS 92504791. Minehead Without 8a. Mound ?10 paces diameter, 2 ft
high, with very large hollow in centre. Uncertain whether a barrow ora spoil heap from No 8.
'J' SS 92524791. Minehead Without 8b. Mound 2 ft high. Uncertain
whether a barrow or spoil heap from No 8.
'H' SS 92554790. Minehead Without 9. Bowl barrow 16 paces diameter
and 2 ft high.
'L' SS 92604783. Minehead Without 10. Bowl barrow 17 paces diameter
and 1 ft high with slight hollow in centre.
'M' SS 92604784. Minehead Without 10a. Mound marked on OS 6", not
now visible.
Nos 1-6 and 8-10 visited by Grinsell 11th September 1959.
Two or three barrows of this group were opened in 1807 by Richard
Fenton (b) with no result excepting charcoal only. (4)

SS 925479. Group of cairns east of Selworthy Beacon. Scheduled. (5)
A mound, possibly a barrow has been located at SS 9261 4787 and is 13 paces in diameter. (6)

This group of Bronze Age burial cairns were recorded as part of the RCHME Exmoor project. The cairns were located using differential GPS and are described under the following records: SS 94 NW 102-112 inclusive. Apart from SS 94 NW 112, which has been destroyed and is now only recorded from documentary sources, the monuments are well preserved, and form an impressive linear group of cairns on the ridge leading up to the summit at Selworthy Beacon. The ridge looks out over the Bristol Channel to S Wales on the north, and over to Dunkery Beacon to the south (7).
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17th December 2014ce

Rowbarrows (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

Details of barrow on Pastscape

A heavily mutilated Bronze Age cairn can be seen as an earthwork on aerial photographs, to the west of Dunkery Beacon. The earthwork measures up to 25 metres in diameter and field investigation reveal it stands up to 1.6 metres high. Numerous small and shallow quarry pits, probably the source of the cairn material, lie to the south and west of the monument.
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17th December 2014ce
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