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Foage (Round Barrow(s)) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Foage</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Foage</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Foage</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Foage</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
2nd September 2014ce

Zennor Quoit (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Folklore

The logan stone up on Zennor Hill has a sad tale attached to it, associated with Carn Galva to the west:
The giant of Carn Galva was a gentle character who protected the people from the more warlike giants of Lelant. He was a playful, sociable giant, fond of a young fellow from Choon, who used to visit him. One day they were playing Quoits, when the giant “tapped” his playfellow on the head with the tips of his fingers. At the same time he said, “be sure to come again tomorrow, my son, and we will have a capital game of bob”.

But the giant’s fingers had gone right through the boy’s skull, and though he tried to save him, it was no use. The giant mourned for his dead friend, but in seven years or so he pined away and died of a broken heart. The logan stone on which he used to rock himself remains at Zennor.


Robert Hunt, Popular Romances of the West of England, 3rd edn, London, Chatto and
Windus, 1881
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
2nd September 2014ce

Caisteal An Dunriachaidh (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Caisteal An Dunriachaidh</b>Posted by Blackwater<b>Caisteal An Dunriachaidh</b>Posted by Blackwater<b>Caisteal An Dunriachaidh</b>Posted by Blackwater Posted by Blackwater
2nd September 2014ce

The Boxes (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

This is probably the barrow mentioned in the list of lows in Plot. ";and that other in a field near the left hand the way, as you pass between Mathfield and Ellaston near Colwich-Common, without a name; and another larger over against it, at the other end of the common, which they call Row-Low." Source: "The Natural History of Stafford-shire" Plot, R. 1686 p.404 paragraph 21.

So Calwich Low and Row Low both have names attached so the barrow near The Boxes is probably the one 'without a name'.
BrownEdger Posted by BrownEdger
2nd September 2014ce

Hanging Bank, Ecton Hill (Round Barrow(s)) — Folklore

A Giant's Grave?

Robert Plot mentions that men's bones "of an extraordinary size" were found when a Low on Ecton Hill was opened. Apparently these bones were "preserved for some time by one Mr. Hamilton vicar of Alstonefield". Source: The Natural History of Stafford-shire", Plot, R. 1686. p.330 paragraph 109.

This is probably the low mentioned by Plot "on Ecton" in the list of lows on p.404 paragraph 21.

When Carrington opened Hanging Bank barrow on 18th May 1848 he noted that the site had been previously disturbed.

Bateman believed that this barrow must be the one Plot refers to as it is the only one of the five on Ecton that showed evidence of having previously been dug into.

There are plenty of examples from around the world of "Giant's bones" being discovered which are in fact the bones of large animals that have been misidentified - is that the case here? Maybe / maybe not - there are certainly examples of animals being interred in barrows in Staffordshire but these tend to be either smaller animals such as a dog, a pig or a polecat or they are part of an animal such as an Ox's head or antler tines. So could this just be the burial of a strapping, big warrior? Would that warrant the description "...bones...of an extraordinary size"?

It is a pity we do not know what Mr. Hamilton did with the bones he 'preserved'.
BrownEdger Posted by BrownEdger
2nd September 2014ce
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