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Bog (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Bog</b>Posted by tiompan<b>Bog</b>Posted by tiompan tiompan Posted by tiompan
23rd May 2015ce

Cerrig y Gof (Burial Chamber) — Images

<b>Cerrig y Gof</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Cerrig y Gof</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Cerrig y Gof</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Cerrig y Gof</b>Posted by A R Cane A R Cane Posted by A R Cane
22nd May 2015ce

Carn Bica (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Carn Bica</b>Posted by A R Cane A R Cane Posted by A R Cane
22nd May 2015ce

Bache Hill and the Whimble (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Bache Hill and the Whimble</b>Posted by Clovis Posted by Clovis
22nd May 2015ce

Maen du'r Arddu (Natural Rock Feature) — Folklore

I've been puzzling over the old maps. The grid reference given is where the stone's marked even now. I was excited to find this photo on Geograph - doesn't it match the description well? But perhaps that's what rocks look like round there - I think it's not quite on the spot where the grid reference is. So that's confusing. We need an on-the-spot reporter.

Though I'm not sure it's worth the risk of finding out if the rumours are true. Or maybe it is. Might be untrue, and if it is true, you've got a 50:50 chance.
In a stony place, called Yr Arddu, Black Ham, pretty high in Cwm brwynog farm, on the ascent of Snowdon hill, there is a very large loose stone, called Maen du yr Arddu, i.e. The black Stone of Arddu; upon the top of which there is another lesser stone, seemingly as if it had been raised there by hands.

It is said, that if two persons were to sleep a night on the top of this stone, in the morning one would find himself endued with the gift of poetry, and the other would become insane.

And accordingly it is affirmed, that in a frolic two men, one called Huwcyn Sion y Canu, and the other Huw Belissa, agreed to sleep on the top of it one summer night: in the morning one found himself inspired with the celestial muse, and the other was quite bereaved of his senses.

It seems that both of these were of the lower order of minstrels, and very probably both of them drunk when they slept there: one, it should seem (having the appellation y Canu, Singer or Songster added to his name, and being addicted to singing) found his spirits in the morning in an exhilerated state, and the other not quite recovered from his intoxication. Imagination might have co-operated, so as to make him who was cheerful to fancy that he was really inspired, and to give the other an idea that he was really mad.
Or: how to kill a romantic idea stone cold dead with the application of reason.

From Observations in the Snowdon Mountains by William Williams (1802).
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
20th May 2015ce

Bwlch-y-Ddeufaen (Standing Stones) — Folklore

An early telling of the tale. No mention of the hole. But you can apparently use the stones to judge the size of the giant.
... there is a wide difference between [sepulchral] heaps, and those on the highest summits of these hills; the latter are formed of large building stones, the former chiefly of small stones, such as can be carried by hand;

which I think is sufficient proof that they were intended for different purposes; one in memory of the dead deposited under them, the other the ruins of temporary buildings, which sheltered persons on the watch, who were to give the country signals, by lighting fire at the approach of an enemy, in time of war.

And besides, those on the summits are commonly known by some name, such as Carnedd Llewelyn, Carnedd Ddafydd, Carnedd y Filiast, &c. the others seldom any names given them, unless they are named from fabulous events; such as that on Bwlch y Ddeufaen, which is called Barclodiad y Gawres, literally, The Giantess's Apron full. The tale is thus:

A huge Giant, in company with his wife, travelling towards the island of Mona, with an intention of settling amongst the first inhabitants that had removed there; and having been informed that there was but a narrow channel which divided it from the continent, took up two large stones, one under each arm, to carry with him as a preparatory for making a bridge over this channel; and his lady had her apron filled with small stones for the same purpose: but meeting a man on this spot with a large parcel of old shoes on his shoulders, the Giant asked him, How far it was to Mona?

The man replied, that it was so far, that he had worn out those shoes in travelling from Mona to that place. The Giant on hearing this dropt down the stones, one on each side of him, where they now stand upright, about a hundred yards or more distant from each other; the space between them was occupied by this Goliah's [sic] body. His mistress at the same time opened her apron, and dropt down the contents of it, which formed this heap.

This and such like tales, though modelled and modernized perhaps from age to age, according to the genius and the language of the times, were, I am of opinion, originally intended as hyperboles, to magnify the prowess and magnanimity of renowned persons; from which we may conclude, that these heaps, especially those that have pillars near them, are very ancient, even prior to the Christian era.
From Observations in the Snowdon Mountains by William Williams (1802).
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
20th May 2015ce
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