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Seaford Head

Hillfort

<b>Seaford Head</b>Posted by GLADMANImage © Robert Gladstone
Nearest Town:Seaford (2km NNW)
OS Ref (GB):   TV495975 / Sheet: 199
Latitude:50° 45' 25.95" N
Longitude:   0° 7' 11.32" E

Added by Rhiannon


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Seaford Head Bowl Barrow Round Barrow(s)

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<b>Seaford Head</b>Posted by A R Cane <b>Seaford Head</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Seaford Head</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Seaford Head</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Seaford Head</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Seaford Head</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Seaford Head</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Seaford Head</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Seaford Head</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Seaford Head</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Seaford Head</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Seaford Head</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Folklore

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Seaford Head is an Iron Age hillfort, but it actually contains an older, early Bronze Age round barrow. Folklore seems to connect it with both the fairy folk and the Romans:
An almost unapproachable cave in the face of the cliff at Seaford Head is called (says M. A. Lower) Puck Church Parlour, and is the scene of an ancient superstition. A shepherd on the cliff top told me (1875) that it was called Buck Church; his boy had been in it, but he couldn't get down the face of the cliff. (1875.)
p162 in: Scraps of Folklore Collected by John Philipps Emslie
C. S. Burne
Folklore, Vol. 26, No. 2. (Jun. 30, 1915), pp. 153-170.

A short distance from the haven [Cuckmere Haven] a steep gulley leads to the beach with a convenient chain and rope to prevent too sudden a descent. It has been suggested that through this gap the Romans passed from their moored fleets to the fortified settlements above. It was at one time possible to descend by another opening higher up the cliff to a ledge called "Puck Church Parlour." This is now inaccessible except to seabirds.
From chapter 2 of 'Seaward Sussex', by Edric Holmes (1920).
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
16th December 2006ce

Latest posts for Seaford Head

Seaford Head Bowl Barrow (Round Barrow(s)) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Seaford Head Bowl Barrow</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Seaford Head Bowl Barrow</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Seaford Head Bowl Barrow</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
9th October 2011ce

Seaford Head Bowl Barrow (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

Incredibly... this denuded bowl barrow, standing within the north-western arc of the hillfort, has a golf bunker cut into its easten flank. Yeah, you really, really couldn't make it up, particularly since this is supposedly a scheduled ancient monument (no. 27025).

One wonders if General Pitt Rivers, who excavated the barrow in 1876, played golf? I would hope not. Whatever, the game and its adherents have had - and continue to have - a very detrimental effect upon our national heritage. And for what? Shame on them.

According to HER (ref MES1704) the general found '....pottery fragments, broken and polished flint celts, flint saws and some charcoal' in two holes near the centre of the barrow. HER also notes that 'Other flints, including a barbed and tanged arrowhead were found in other parts of the barrow. The finds are in the British Museum. There was no trace of a burial'.
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
9th October 2011ce