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Lancashire

<b>Lancashire</b>Posted by IronManWinter Hill © IronMan
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Web searches for Lancashire

Sites in this group:

7 posts
Anderton Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
7 posts
18 sites
Anglezarke Moor Group
6 posts
Ashleigh Barrow Round Barrow(s)
10 posts
Askew Heights Enclosure
1 post
Beadle Hill Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
5 posts
Bleara Lowe Round Cairn
38 posts
Bleasedale Circle Timber Circle
9 posts
Boar's Den Round Barrow(s)
2 posts
Borwick Cairn Round Cairn
1 post
Brock Hall Tumulus Artificial Mound
1 post
Brown Hills Beck Barrow East Round Barrow(s)
8 posts
Brown Low Round Barrow(s)
2 posts
Buck Stone Natural Rock Feature
10 posts
Burwains Camp Enclosure
Burwain's Farm Stone Circle
2 posts
Cant Clough Ring Cairn
3 posts
Carve Hill Round Barrow(s)
14 posts
Castercliff Camp Hillfort
8 posts
Castlesteads Hillfort
5 posts
1 site
Castle Hill (Leck) Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
5 posts
Charters Moss Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
37 posts
Cheetham Close Stone Circle
3 posts
1 site
Claughton Enclosure
4 posts
Cliviger Law Cairn(s)
4 posts
Cross Gills Mound Artificial Mound
19 posts
Delf Hill Stone Circle
5 posts
Ell Clough Ring Cairn
5 posts
Extwistle Moor Stone Circle
9 posts
Fairy Holes Cave / Rock Shelter
14 posts
The Great Stone Of Fourstones Natural Rock Feature
13 posts
Hambledon Pasture Round Barrow(s)
11 posts
Hanging Stone Natural Rock Feature
4 posts
Hawksclough Hillfort
11 posts
Hellclough Stone Circle
2 posts
Holdens Farm Barrows Round Barrow(s)
7 posts
Jacksons Barrow Artificial Mound
10 posts
Jeppe Knave Grave Cairn(s)
12 posts
Little Hameldon Long Barrow
3 posts
Longridge Fell Cairn Round Cairn
5 posts
Lower Heysham - Heysham Head Natural Rock Feature
1 post
Mawdesley Blue Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
10 posts
Mosley Height Stone Circle
5 posts
Parlick Pike Cairn Round Cairn
9 posts
Pendle Hill Sacred Hill
2 posts
Pike Lowe Cairn(s)
2 posts
Pleasington Cemetery Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
3 posts
Portfield Hillfort Hillfort
7 posts
Pots and Pans Stone Natural Rock Feature
5 posts
Queen of the Fairies Chair Natural Rock Feature
8 posts
Ring Stones Ring Cairn
1 post
Ring Stones Hill Stone Circle
3 posts
Round Hill Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
3 posts
Sellet Bank Enclosure Enclosure
9 posts
Slipper Lowe Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
6 posts
Standing Stones Hill Ring Cairn
6 posts
Stump Cross Standing Stone / Menhir
29 posts
1 site
Summerhouse Hill Round Cairn
8 posts
Thirteen Stones Hill Stone Circle
6 posts
Torrisholme Round Barrow(s)
1 post
Tumulus near Four Lane Ends Round Barrow(s)
6 posts
Twist Castle & Barrow Artificial Mound
10 posts
The Two Lads Cairn(s)
17 posts
5 sites
Warton Crag Hillfort
10 posts
Whitelow Cairn(s)
12 posts
White Brow Cairn(s)
1 post
Wild Bank Hill Round Cairn
8 posts
1 site
Winckley Lowes Round Barrow(s)
14 posts
1 site
Winter Hill Cairn(s)
10 posts
Winter Hill Cairn Cairn(s)
9 posts
Worsthorne Hill Stone Circle
5 posts
Wycoller Hall Cup Marked Stone
Sites of disputed antiquity:
1 post
All Hallows Well Sacred Well
3 posts
Cheetham Barrow Artificial Mound
6 posts
Moortop Barrows Round Barrow(s)

News

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Dig Unearths Evidence Of A Bronze Age Settlement


Dig unearths ancient mine and Roman road
Last posted: Friday 10 October 2003 12:10
ARCHAEOLOGISTS have unearthed evidence of a Roman road and Bronze Age settlement at a multi-million pound business and leisure park development... continues...
Jane Posted by Jane
10th October 2003ce
Edited 28th October 2003ce

Miscellaneous

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Lancashire and Lancaster (and Kirkby Lonsdale) take their names from the River Lune, which rises in Cumbria and flows for 44 miles to the Irish Sea.

Speculative origins for the river's name include a Celtic word meaning "pure" and a possible derivation of a local Celtic God called Ialonus.

[Added for Postie, better late than never!]
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
13th August 2012ce

Druidical Rock Basins.

Dr. Borlase, in his Antiquities of Cornwall, notices the existence of Druidical Rock Basins, which appear to have been scooped out of the granite rocks and boulders which lie on the tops of the hills in the county. Several such cavities in stones are found on Brimham Rocks, near Knaresborough, and they have also been found at Plumpton and Rigton, in Yorkshire, and on Stanton Moor, in Derbyshire.

The writer first drew attention to the fact of similar Druidical remains existing in Lancashire in a paper read before the Historical Society of Lancashire and Cheshire, in December, 1864. They are found in considerable numbers around Boulsworth, Gorple, Todmorden, and on the hills which separate Lancashire from Yorkshire between these places.

Commencing the enumeration of the groups of boulders, &c., containing rock basins, with the slopes of Boulsworth, about seven miles from Burnley, we have first the Standing Stones, mostly single blocks of millstone grit, at short distances from each other on the north-western side of the hill. one is locally termed the Buttock Stone, and near it is a block which has a circular cavity scooped out on its flat upper surface. Not far from these are the Joiner Stones, the Abbot Stone, the Weather Stones, and the Law Lad Stones (? from llad, British, sacrifices).

Next come the Great and Little Saucer Stones, so named from the cavities scooped out upon them. The Little Chair Stones, the Fox Stones, and the Broad Head Stones lie at no great distance, each group containing numerous like cavities. Several of these groups are locally named from resemblance to animals or other objects, as the Grey Stones and the Steeple Stones on Barn Hill, and one spur of Boulsworth is called Wycoller Ark, as resembling a farmer's chest or ark.

On Warcock Hill several groups of natural rocks and boulders are locally named Dave or Dew Stones. On the surface of one immense Dave Stone boulder is a perfect hemispherical cavity, ten inches in diameter. The surface of a nother contains an oblong basin of larger dimensions, with a long grooved channel leading from its curved contour towards the edge of the stone. On a third there are four circular cavities of varying dimensions, the largest in the centre, and three others surrounding it, but none of these is more than a few inches in diameter. At the Bride Stones, near Todmorden, thirteen cavities were counted on one block, and eleven on another. All the basins here and elsewhere are formed on the flat surfaces of the blocks; their upper surfaces always being parallel to the lamination of the stone.

Along Widdop Moor we find the Grey Stones, the Fold Hole Stones, the Clattering Stones, and the Rigging Stones; the last named from occupying the rig or ridge of the hills in the locality. Amongst the Bride Stones is an immense mass of rock which might almost be classed among the rocking stones. it is about twenty-five feet in height, at least twelve feet across its broadest part, and rests on a base only about two feet in diameter.

The Todmorden group contains the Hawk Stones, on Stansfield Moor, not far from Stiperden Cross, on the line of the Long Causeway (a Roman road); the Bride Stones, near Windy Harbour; the Chisley Stones, near Keelham; and Hoar Law, not far from Ashenhurst Royd and Todmorden. The rock basins on these boulders are very numerous, and of all sizes from a few inches in diameter and depth to upwards of two feet. The elliptical axes of some of these basins did not appear to the writer to have been caused by the action of wind or water, or to follow any regular law.

Lastly, taking for a centre, Gorple, about five miles south-east of Burnley is another extensive group of naked rocks and boulders. Close to the solitary farm-house there are the Gorple Stones; and at a short distance the Hanging Stones form conspicuous objects in the sombre landscape. On Thistleden Dean are the Upper, Middle, and Lower Whinberry Stones, so named from the "whinberry" shrubs, with which this moor abounds. The Higher and Lower Boggart Stones come next, and these are followed by the Wicken Clough, and other minor groups of stones. Above Gorple Bottom is another set of grey stones; and these are followed by the Upper, Middle, and Lower Hanging Stones, on Shuttleworth Moor. The rock basins here are very numerous, and mostly well defined. There are forty-three cavities in these Gorple, Gorple Gate, and Hanging Stones, ranging from four to forty inches in length, from four to twenty-five in breadth, and from two to thirteen inches in depth.
From John Harland's 'Lancashire Folklore' (1867).
http://www.archive.org/stream/lancashirefolklo00harl#page/106/mode/2up
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
27th February 2012ce

Links

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Transcription from a diary (1953-54)


Just found this link to a diary of one of the founders of Chorley Archeology Society.

In it he mentions finds from Anglezarke and the surrounding districts.
Rivington Pike Posted by Rivington Pike
12th November 2006ce
Edited 12th November 2006ce

Old Maps of Lancashire


The County Council has done it again !. Unlike MARIO, this site gives access to a lagre collecton of maps covering the county.
From general Lancasire maps such as Speed 1610, Lancashire Town maps c. 1890 to O.S. 1st Edition 6" maps c. 1845. A useful research tool!
Rivington Pike Posted by Rivington Pike
1st August 2003ce

Northern Earth


A site full of 'TMA' type material especially covering the North of England region.
Rivington Pike Posted by Rivington Pike
1st August 2003ce

MARIO - Maps And Related Information Online


A great research tool provided by Lancashire County Council that enables you to overlay and compare the current edition of O.S. map for Lancashire with the 1st edition O.S. map. You can also drop on aerial photograph layer to give you a better feel of the lay of the land.
Rivington Pike Posted by Rivington Pike
26th June 2003ce
Edited 30th July 2003ce

Latest posts for Lancashire

Showing 1-10 of 771 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Barrow Hill (Kerbed Cairn) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Barrow Hill</b>Posted by LivingRocks Posted by LivingRocks
16th January 2015ce

Summerhouse Hill (Round Cairn) — Miscellaneous

In 1935 Yealand archaeologist Colonel Oliver North carried out a survey of the site. He plotted the position of 6 limestone boulders and demonstrated that 4 of them were on the circumference of a circle 460 feet in diameter. He also noted depressions in the ground which might have housed other stones from the circle. Two remaining stones could conceivably have formed part of an outer ring, and were both about 330 feet from the centre of the supposed monument. Colonel North detected what he thought might be a large ditch on the north-western side of the circle. And he speculated that some of the large stones used as foundations for the Rawlinson summerhouse might have been pillaged from the stone circle. Others have suggested that summerhouse was itself built upon a cairn.

There has never been an archaeological dig on the site and some experts are not convinced that the stones are anything other than lime-stone boulders randomly deposited by a retreating glacier. But Summerhouse Hill is an atmospheric place.

Leighton Moss Ice Age To Present Day by Andy Denwood (Published 2014)
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
15th January 2015ce

Warton Crag (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Warton Crag</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
15th January 2015ce

Summerhouse Hill (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Summerhouse Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Summerhouse Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
14th January 2015ce

Barrow Hill (Kerbed Cairn) — Images

<b>Barrow Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
13th January 2015ce

Barrow Hill (Kerbed Cairn) — Miscellaneous

There are a few other reasons to suggest that Summerhouse Hill was special to the people who lived around Leighton Moss. A few hundred yards to the south east, down the slope towards the metalled road on Peter Hill, are the remains of a round kerbed cairn.

Set among the trees and difficult to spot at first, the cairn is less than 2 feet high but 40 feet across. It has a noticeable circular dent in its top where it was opened up more than 200m years ago. The celebrated London physician and sometime amateur antiquarian John Coakley Lettsom witness the excavation of the burial site in 1778.

Lettsom was a Quaker and the founder of the Medical Society of London. He was also a regular visitor at the home of Thomas Rawlinson, the Yealand merchant and shipowner. In an address to the Society of Antiquaries of London, Lettsom declared that on opening the cairn he had discovered 'an urn containing between 3 and 4 quarts of human bones' and 'a human skeleton, and a large glass bead of a blue colour above an inch in diameter'.

Sadly no trace remains of the bones or bead. And while the Bronze Age beaker sat for many years on a shelf at nearby Yealand Manor, local gossip has it that it was broken and thrown away by a superstitious house-maid. Interestingly, in his talk to fellow antiquarians Lettsom said that his dig took place on Barrow Hill - an old name for Summerhouse Hill - where there were 'many barrows of earth and stone'. And he added that since his own excavation other barrows had been opened and many human bones found.

Leighton Moss Ice Age To Present Day by Andy Denwood (Published 2014)
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
13th January 2015ce

Dog Holes Cave (Cave / Rock Shelter) — Miscellaneous

A short walk south-west from Summerhouse Hill is the highest point overlooking the moss. Warton Crag is 530 feet above sea level and here too there's evidence of early human settlement. A cave called the Dog Holes was excavated between 1909 and 1913 by the Manchester Museum curator J. W. Jackson. His work showed that it had been lived in from Neolithic times, through the Iron Age to Roman times. Jackson unearthed human and animal bones as well as Roman and pre-Roman pottery fragments and jewellery. He also discovered lumps of iron slag which suggested that early residents may have been smelting iron ore that had been mined locally.

Leighton Moss Ice Age To Present Day by Andy Denwood (Published 2014)
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
13th January 2015ce

Warton Crag (Hillfort) — Miscellaneous

The summit of the Crag has a commanding view over Morecambe Bay and vessels approaching the sea entrance to Leighton Moss could be spotted immediately from here. On the northern and eastern sides of the summit - and really difficult to make out - are the remains of three stone-built ramparts which make up a small fort. Thought for a long time to be Iron Age, archaeologists more recently have been divided about it's origins. Some have suggested it could be older - perhaps Neolithic or Bronze Age - while others have noted a similarity with post-Roman defensive settlements elsewhere in Britain. As with Summerhouse Hill, eighteenth-century antiquarians report the excavation of burial mounds on the skirts of Warton Crag' in which human remains and earthenware beakers were found.

Walking around the moss and exploring the surrounding hills, the impression gained is that this was an important area for prehistoric peoples. The woods, the marshy fringes of the bay and the seashore itself were clearly valuable sources of food and materials.

The hills provided sites to bury their dead and possibly somewhere where religious ceremonies and celebrations were held. The summit of Warton Crag meanwhile has been a safe haven for many generations of local people: a look-out post to spot the arrival of threatening newcomers and a fortress to retreat into in the event of attack.

Leighton Moss Ice Age To Present Day by Andy Denwood (Published 2014)
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
13th January 2015ce

Pendle Hill (Sacred Hill) — Images

<b>Pendle Hill</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
12th September 2014ce
Showing 1-10 of 771 posts. Most recent first | Next 10