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Lancashire

<b>Lancashire</b>Posted by DavidTPikestones © David Turner
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Web searches for Lancashire

Sites in this group:

7 posts
Anderton Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
7 posts
18 sites
Anglezarke Moor Group
6 posts
Ashleigh Barrow Round Barrow(s)
10 posts
Askew Heights Enclosure
1 post
Beadle Hill Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
5 posts
Bleara Lowe Round Cairn
31 posts
Bleasedale Circle Timber Circle
9 posts
Boar's Den Round Barrow(s)
2 posts
Borwick Cairn Round Cairn
1 post
Brock Hall Tumulus Artificial Mound
1 post
Brown Hills Beck Barrow East Round Barrow(s)
5 posts
Brown Low Round Barrow(s)
2 posts
Buck Stone Natural Rock Feature
10 posts
Burwains Camp Enclosure
Burwain's Farm Stone Circle
2 posts
Cant Clough Ring Cairn
3 posts
Carve Hill Round Barrow(s)
14 posts
Castercliff Camp Hillfort
8 posts
Castlesteads Hillfort
5 posts
1 site
Castle Hill (Leck) Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
5 posts
Charters Moss Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
37 posts
Cheetham Close Stone Circle
3 posts
1 site
Claughton Enclosure
4 posts
Cliviger Law Cairn(s)
4 posts
Cross Gills Mound Artificial Mound
19 posts
Delf Hill Stone Circle
5 posts
Ell Clough Ring Cairn
5 posts
Extwistle Moor Stone Circle
9 posts
Fairy Holes Cave / Rock Shelter
14 posts
The Great Stone Of Fourstones Natural Rock Feature
13 posts
Hambledon Pasture Round Barrow(s)
8 posts
Hanging Stone Natural Rock Feature
4 posts
Hawksclough Hillfort
11 posts
Hellclough Stone Circle
2 posts
Holdens Farm Barrows Round Barrow(s)
7 posts
Jacksons Barrow Artificial Mound
10 posts
Jeppe Knave Grave Cairn(s)
12 posts
Little Hameldon Long Barrow
3 posts
Longridge Fell Cairn Round Cairn
5 posts
Lower Heysham - Heysham Head Natural Rock Feature
1 post
Mawdesley Blue Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
10 posts
Mosley Height Stone Circle
5 posts
Parlick Pike Cairn Round Cairn
7 posts
Pendle Hill Sacred Hill
2 posts
Pike Lowe Cairn(s)
2 posts
Pleasington Cemetery Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
2 posts
Portfield Hillfort Hillfort
7 posts
Pots and Pans Stone Natural Rock Feature
5 posts
Queen of the Fairies Chair Natural Rock Feature
8 posts
Ring Stones Ring Cairn
1 post
Ring Stones Hill Stone Circle
3 posts
Round Hill Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
3 posts
Sellet Bank Enclosure Enclosure
9 posts
Slipper Lowe Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
6 posts
Standing Stones Hill Ring Cairn
6 posts
Stump Cross Standing Stone / Menhir
26 posts
Summerhouse Hill Round Cairn
8 posts
Thirteen Stones Hill Stone Circle
6 posts
Torrisholme Round Barrow(s)
1 post
Tumulus near Four Lane Ends Round Barrow(s)
6 posts
Twist Castle & Barrow Artificial Mound
10 posts
The Two Lads Cairn(s)
15 posts
5 sites
Warton Crag Hillfort
10 posts
Whitelow Cairn(s)
13 posts
White Brow Cairn(s)
8 posts
1 site
Winckley Lowes Round Barrow(s)
14 posts
1 site
Winter Hill Cairn(s)
10 posts
Winter Hill Cairn Cairn(s)
9 posts
Worsthorne Hill Stone Circle
5 posts
Wycoller Hall Cup Marked Stone
Sites of disputed antiquity:
1 post
All Hallows Well Sacred Well
3 posts
Cheetham Barrow Artificial Mound
6 posts
Moortop Barrows Round Barrow(s)

News

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Dig Unearths Evidence Of A Bronze Age Settlement


Dig unearths ancient mine and Roman road
Last posted: Friday 10 October 2003 12:10
ARCHAEOLOGISTS have unearthed evidence of a Roman road and Bronze Age settlement at a multi-million pound business and leisure park development... continues...
Jane Posted by Jane
10th October 2003ce
Edited 28th October 2003ce

Miscellaneous

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Lancashire and Lancaster (and Kirkby Lonsdale) take their names from the River Lune, which rises in Cumbria and flows for 44 miles to the Irish Sea.

Speculative origins for the river's name include a Celtic word meaning "pure" and a possible derivation of a local Celtic God called Ialonus.

[Added for Postie, better late than never!]
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
13th August 2012ce

Druidical Rock Basins.

Dr. Borlase, in his Antiquities of Cornwall, notices the existence of Druidical Rock Basins, which appear to have been scooped out of the granite rocks and boulders which lie on the tops of the hills in the county. Several such cavities in stones are found on Brimham Rocks, near Knaresborough, and they have also been found at Plumpton and Rigton, in Yorkshire, and on Stanton Moor, in Derbyshire.

The writer first drew attention to the fact of similar Druidical remains existing in Lancashire in a paper read before the Historical Society of Lancashire and Cheshire, in December, 1864. They are found in considerable numbers around Boulsworth, Gorple, Todmorden, and on the hills which separate Lancashire from Yorkshire between these places.

Commencing the enumeration of the groups of boulders, &c., containing rock basins, with the slopes of Boulsworth, about seven miles from Burnley, we have first the Standing Stones, mostly single blocks of millstone grit, at short distances from each other on the north-western side of the hill. one is locally termed the Buttock Stone, and near it is a block which has a circular cavity scooped out on its flat upper surface. Not far from these are the Joiner Stones, the Abbot Stone, the Weather Stones, and the Law Lad Stones (? from llad, British, sacrifices).

Next come the Great and Little Saucer Stones, so named from the cavities scooped out upon them. The Little Chair Stones, the Fox Stones, and the Broad Head Stones lie at no great distance, each group containing numerous like cavities. Several of these groups are locally named from resemblance to animals or other objects, as the Grey Stones and the Steeple Stones on Barn Hill, and one spur of Boulsworth is called Wycoller Ark, as resembling a farmer's chest or ark.

On Warcock Hill several groups of natural rocks and boulders are locally named Dave or Dew Stones. On the surface of one immense Dave Stone boulder is a perfect hemispherical cavity, ten inches in diameter. The surface of a nother contains an oblong basin of larger dimensions, with a long grooved channel leading from its curved contour towards the edge of the stone. On a third there are four circular cavities of varying dimensions, the largest in the centre, and three others surrounding it, but none of these is more than a few inches in diameter. At the Bride Stones, near Todmorden, thirteen cavities were counted on one block, and eleven on another. All the basins here and elsewhere are formed on the flat surfaces of the blocks; their upper surfaces always being parallel to the lamination of the stone.

Along Widdop Moor we find the Grey Stones, the Fold Hole Stones, the Clattering Stones, and the Rigging Stones; the last named from occupying the rig or ridge of the hills in the locality. Amongst the Bride Stones is an immense mass of rock which might almost be classed among the rocking stones. it is about twenty-five feet in height, at least twelve feet across its broadest part, and rests on a base only about two feet in diameter.

The Todmorden group contains the Hawk Stones, on Stansfield Moor, not far from Stiperden Cross, on the line of the Long Causeway (a Roman road); the Bride Stones, near Windy Harbour; the Chisley Stones, near Keelham; and Hoar Law, not far from Ashenhurst Royd and Todmorden. The rock basins on these boulders are very numerous, and of all sizes from a few inches in diameter and depth to upwards of two feet. The elliptical axes of some of these basins did not appear to the writer to have been caused by the action of wind or water, or to follow any regular law.

Lastly, taking for a centre, Gorple, about five miles south-east of Burnley is another extensive group of naked rocks and boulders. Close to the solitary farm-house there are the Gorple Stones; and at a short distance the Hanging Stones form conspicuous objects in the sombre landscape. On Thistleden Dean are the Upper, Middle, and Lower Whinberry Stones, so named from the "whinberry" shrubs, with which this moor abounds. The Higher and Lower Boggart Stones come next, and these are followed by the Wicken Clough, and other minor groups of stones. Above Gorple Bottom is another set of grey stones; and these are followed by the Upper, Middle, and Lower Hanging Stones, on Shuttleworth Moor. The rock basins here are very numerous, and mostly well defined. There are forty-three cavities in these Gorple, Gorple Gate, and Hanging Stones, ranging from four to forty inches in length, from four to twenty-five in breadth, and from two to thirteen inches in depth.
From John Harland's 'Lancashire Folklore' (1867).
http://www.archive.org/stream/lancashirefolklo00harl#page/106/mode/2up
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
27th February 2012ce

Links

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Transcription from a diary (1953-54)


Just found this link to a diary of one of the founders of Chorley Archeology Society.

In it he mentions finds from Anglezarke and the surrounding districts.
Rivington Pike Posted by Rivington Pike
12th November 2006ce
Edited 12th November 2006ce

Old Maps of Lancashire


The County Council has done it again !. Unlike MARIO, this site gives access to a lagre collecton of maps covering the county.
From general Lancasire maps such as Speed 1610, Lancashire Town maps c. 1890 to O.S. 1st Edition 6" maps c. 1845. A useful research tool!
Rivington Pike Posted by Rivington Pike
1st August 2003ce

Northern Earth


A site full of 'TMA' type material especially covering the North of England region.
Rivington Pike Posted by Rivington Pike
1st August 2003ce

MARIO - Maps And Related Information Online


A great research tool provided by Lancashire County Council that enables you to overlay and compare the current edition of O.S. map for Lancashire with the 1st edition O.S. map. You can also drop on aerial photograph layer to give you a better feel of the lay of the land.
Rivington Pike Posted by Rivington Pike
26th June 2003ce
Edited 30th July 2003ce

Latest posts for Lancashire

Showing 1-10 of 746 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Anglezarke Misc 5 (Chambered Cairn) — Miscellaneous

This stone and others like it on the plateau are considered to be millstone roughs propped up with little stones. (Anglezarke and Rivington Moors - Archaeological Survey 1986) juamei Posted by juamei
28th January 2014ce

Stronstrey Bank Stone (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Miscellaneous

The following comment was left on "Anglezarle Misc 8" which I think describes this stone. Explains the carvings and that the stone was standing 100 odd years ago...

"Sadly, much nonsense has been talked about with regard to these stones.
There was a man called Andrew Mather who would have been about 120 if he was still alive today. Some 45-50 years ago he told me that when he was a boy, he had two friends and they called themselves 'The Triangle Gang.'
One of their favourite places to meet and camp was a small depression towards the southern end of Stronstrey Bank where there was a fairly tall upright stone. One of the boys carved a small triangle on the face of the rock as a symbol of their 'club.' Some time later, they carved a much larger triangle on the same rock."
juamei Posted by juamei
13th January 2014ce

Cheetham Barrow (Artificial Mound) — Fieldnotes

I headed up to Cheetham barrow today and it is easy to find. It is a nice straightforward 15 minute walk from Hawkshaw village and if you use the OS map it is easy to locate

The barrow is bigger than the pictures suggest and it is a nice, quiet location where you can get some decent but not spectacular views to the south over Manchester.

Its difficult to understand why this location was chosen for the barrow as it is not the highest point around but then again if we knew why our ancestors chose these places then these places wouldn't be as special as they are
Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge
4th January 2014ce

Torrisholme (Round Barrow(s)) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Torrisholme</b>Posted by Vicster Vicster Posted by Vicster
4th June 2013ce

Dog Holes Cave (Cave / Rock Shelter) — Links

Internet Archive


'Preliminary report on the exploration of 'Dog Holes' cave, Warton Crag, near Carnforth, Lancashire' by J Wilfrid Jackson. In the Transactions of the Lancashire and Cheshire Antiquarian Society for 1909, v27. You can also read his third report here.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
14th April 2013ce

Thirteen Stones Hill (Stone Circle) — Fieldnotes

I headed up here one evening. It is only a short walk and is easy to get to. There is ample parking behind the houses at the entrance to Clough head quarry.

Sadly there is only one stone remaining upright and it looks quite new almost as if it has been placed upright only over the past few hundred years.

It is a desolate place. Be prepared to come across sheep but no other walkers.

There are still some stones that are collapsed and lying in the ground but it is easy to see that this is a neglected site. Very sad!
Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge
2nd April 2013ce

Buck Stone (Natural Rock Feature) — Folklore

Near the top of the hill is a huge stone in the hedge to the right of the road. This is the Buck Stone, and in olden days, when the passengers used to toil up the hill behind the coach, a practical joke was often played on guileless travellers. They used to be told to put their heads near the stone to listen to the tide coming in over the Bay miles away, and if they did so their heads were knocked against the stone. Now the narrow old coach road is private, but Mr. Bainbridge at Greenlands Farm would allow anyone to inspect the stone if desired.
From T Pape's Warton and George Washington's Ancestors (1913).
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
9th February 2013ce

The Bride's Chair (Natural Rock Feature) — Folklore

I can't see this marked on a map so I've given it the grid reference for the Dog Holes cave for now.
Not far from the Dog Lots is a large natural seat in the face of a great limestone boulder, which towers to a height of eleven feet. The seat will accommodate three or four people, and is known as the Bride's Chair. It was customary years ago when a marriage took place at Warton Church for the bridal party to repair to this spot and for the bride to sit in this seat and look out over the wide expanse of Morecambe Bay. By doing so happiness in their married life was ensured to the newly wedded couple.

Almost sheer down two hundred feet below is the road to Silverdale, and in the direction of that village can be seen the large stone column at Jenny Brown point.
From Warton and George Washington's Ancestors by T Pape (1913).

I think this stone and its tradition was mentioned in Lucas's history of Warton, written in the first half of the 18th century (but i've not seen a copy).
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
9th February 2013ce

The Bride's Chair (Natural Rock Feature) — Images

<b>The Bride's Chair</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
9th February 2013ce

Dog Holes Cave (Cave / Rock Shelter) — Images

<b>Dog Holes Cave</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
9th February 2013ce
Showing 1-10 of 746 posts. Most recent first | Next 10